Jump to content
Latest News
  • Apologies for the downtime. We had to update our backend and theme.
  • We will continue pushing updates.
  • Apologies for the downtime. We had to update our backend and theme.
  • We will continue pushing updates.
  • Sign in to follow this  

    [HARDWARE MOD] Upgrade the Phoenix (Clevo P870DM-G) from FHD to 4K (PICTURE GUIDE)


    Akaraah

    Hi all! Figured since there aren't many avenues out there as of yet that properly show how to dissect your phoenix, I'd try to take up the mantle with my own experience in upgrading the LCD panel from FHD 1080 to the 4K panel. Before we get started, I'd like to present a list a useful tools to have beforehand if you intend to pursue this endeavor. I'll be providing pictures of my own tools as well as links to various components you need for purchase if you intend to follow-suit:

     

    ATTENTION HUGE PICTURE LOAD AHEAD! :D

     

    Spoiler

     


    1.) Anti-static wrist band: 

    2016-02-03 17.21.20.jpg

    You should always have something prepared to control static whether it be the wristband here or an anti-static matte. All it takes is a single static discharge on the MOBO of your machine to scramble it. Also, the surface you choose to work on plays a role. For me, I prefer soft surfaces that are distinctly colored from the components I have to remove so I don't lose track of them.

    2.) Prying tool(s):
    2016-02-03 17.26.30.jpg
    During the tear-down I waited to the very end to remove the screen frame and then eventually the screen, in retrospect, I should have done that first because I had to be extra careful when I finally got to that point with the top-base plate completely removed. So on, I recommend having multiple, smooth-edged prying tools to minimize potential scuffs or indention to the screen frame. I only used the IFIXIT tool for that but for the sake of freedom, choose whatever you're most comfortable using to get the job done. Once I get to that part in the tutorial I'll show the ideal spot to start opening with your tool of choice.

    3: Forceps:
    2016-02-03 17.27.01.jpg
    Not the best image, I know, but these also happen to be anti-static and help with removing ribbon cables, opening/lifting tabs, and so on and so forth. A godsend for people with sausage fingers.

    4.) Storage for screws and other small bits:
    2016-02-03 17.24.30.jpg
    Really, this is redundant but with that said, keep special screws separate from generic ones. A good majority of the screws on the phoenix are the same specifications in dimension/length, but for the ones that aren't which may be shown throughout the teardown, do yourself a favor and put them somewhere distinct but obvious. Also be sure to remove ALL screws that frame the laptop at the bottom once open (the other edges, around the heatsink, etc). And to remove the darn dummy SD card. There are quite a few times I tried to remove the frame and forgot it was there. XD With that said...

    2016-02-03 17.28.58.jpg
    Remove the back of the laptop (I won't be showing that process since there are plenty of other guides for that and to get to the important bits quicker). 

     

    Next: The battery. Remove it. and then you'll be confronted with these three ribbon cables:
    2016-02-03 17.32.14.jpg
    Notice the "MB" printed on each? Lift the black tabs using the forceps or another small, precise tool. Heck, your fingers if they're small enough.
    2016-02-03 17.34.20.jpg
    This isn't really a difficult maneuver. The hardest for me being the cableicon1.png that rests to the far left and is bent (the one with the metal-ish sleeve). With that done, move on to disconnecting the subwoofer.
    2016-02-03 17.31.07.jpg

    At the bottom you'll see where it connects with a tab at the very top. From my experience it's easy to take at with only your fingers since they are durable enough. Just be sure to bring your finger tips as close as you can on the wire and to pull both cords at the same time.
    2016-02-03 17.31.48.jpg
    Here is what it looks like once removed so when you reconnect you'll have an idea how to re-plant it. Future-speak, I used the forceps to re-align the cord and used my screw-driver to push it back in correctly. Aim for the other edges so you don't end-up damaging the connections.

    As a bonus, here's a picture of the screw-driver I used the entire time. From GPU heatsink to screen panel. It's pretty reliable. Not to mention magnet-tipped so that it's easy to lift screws in some of the deeper spots with a steady-hand. Philips brand. Specifics are printed on the holster.
    2016-02-03 17.25.01.jpg

     

    Next:2016-02-03 17.52.04.jpg

    And:

    2016-02-03 17.49.11.jpgRemove this back-plate with the various ports on the back. the screws have unique dimensions but are black like the majority of generic screws so keep them separate .

    2016-02-03 17.50.39.jpg
    Just to keep this in perspective, here's an image of the plate removed. While it doesn't feel cheap, it is very thin so keep it somewhere safe where you won't accidentally lean on and bend it. Now with all that done. We'll move on to the keyboard and which connections and sever so-to-speak...

    2016-02-03 17.58.30.jpg
    Incase you don't already know, to remove the keyboard you must find the hole on the bottom of the laptop labeled "KB" and stick an narrow, firm object through. Beforehand I usually turn the laptop on its side and push. In my case, I usually use a thin screwdriver or two unraveled paper clips and bend them ever so slightly around eachother. For an example, refer to this @HTWingNut videoicon1.png:  around the 7:00 to 7:25 mark. It's slightly older model but pretty much the same principle. Now let's identify where the connections need to be undone. Firstly:
    2016-02-03 17.59.00.jpg
    The two primary keyboard ribbon cable.s. To remove, I recommend forceps. For the bottom, place the tips of the forceps on an indention on the place tab and pull towards the screen. The bottom ribbon should then be easy to remove. For the top cable, the same idea. When you decide to re-insert the keyboard connections. remember for the black tab (bottom connection) ribbon goes BENEATH the black tab and not sandwiched between the black and white. For the top connector the ribbon cable must go BETWEEN. Both strange and simple enough.

     

    2016-02-03 17.58.36.jpg
    The ribbon cable to the leftside of the image and just under the CMOS battery controls the lighting on your keyboard. push the black tab up and pull the cable out. CMOS, RAM, and M.2 SSDs can stay put the entire time during your venture. We just want to get all the screws securing the faceplate down and the ribbon cables removed.

    2016-02-03 18.01.00.jpg
    Now that we've removed the ribbon cable that dictates keyboard lighting we're going to take out the Speaker cable. It's pretty much the same as the subwoofer. Two or more firm fingers (or forceps if you have sausage fingers or Shrek hands) nearest the connector on the cables seen here; tug and remove. When re-applying, this one isn't nearly as cumbersome as re-connecting the subwoofer.

    2016-02-03 17.59.05.jpg
    This guy right here coming from the very top near a would-be M.2. Very simple. Flip the tab up, and gently pull the blue tab outward then upward.

    2016-02-03 17.58.45.jpg
    And then this last ribbon cable marked "MB". It comes from the underside of the faceplate and connects it the the part of the MOBO that will be disconnected once the faceplate is removed. Be sure it is not stuck when you re-apply the faceplate. Always be sure when you put your machine back together that all cords are not trapped and are fully re-affirmed in the right tabs. The keyboard was a drag for me to get right because if it wasn't all the way secured certain keys won't work. I recommend putting a soft, cleaning-cloth inbetween the keyboard to keep the magnets from sucking it all the way down just in case you need to make minute adjustments.

    2016-02-03 18.01.53.jpg

    Be sure to take out any screws on the sectors you may see above. Those are often missed. Once again, all the components you see here can be left in during the entire process. But keep in mind that the wi-fi card often has a piece of tape on it on it connected to the faceplate. Nothing drastic, just remove it or temporarily stick it entirely to the wif card. Okay, lets move on to the stuff everyone has been REALLY wanting to see...

     

    2016-02-03 18.21.09.jpg
    FACEPLATE REMOVAL!!! To start, bring the laptop screen towards you (as in a bent hinge but not so bent that it begins to fall because of gravity). Start prying with your fingers at the back (where the speakers are) while keeping the detachable half secureicon1.png to whatever surface you're utilizing. My own personal method: I also try pushing my thumb against the MOBO (be sure hands are clean, dry, and you're wearing an anti-static strap if you opt this method). Visualize yourself holding the laptop at a slight 30 or less incline and using your left thumb to push the faceplate away. The area where the CMOS battery tends to be is the easiest. Will provide more images of the plate to show any loose parts you might want to lookout for.

    2016-02-03 18.21.20.jpg
    Flipped faceplate. You can now see where all the connections are made. Keep in mind their positions when putting the phoenix back together. Notice the ribbon cables that were formerly under where the battery would sit.

    2016-02-03 18.21.48.jpg
    A full-shot of the laptop without the cover plate. In all its beauty. At this point this is why I mentioned earlier that I should have removed the screen first. With the core components largely removed, the screen tends to make the laptop not so securely planted so you may find yourself applying minimal pressure/handling to keep it from rocking.

    2016-02-03 18.21.54.jpg
    Bringing our attention to the EDP cable here. Remove the tape to the left. For removal I'd recommend pulling on the outer-edge of the black sleeve. As you can see there's a black handle bar which I tore by mistake when trying to use it to lift the EDP connector from the board.

    2016-02-03 18.22.34.jpg
    Now that it's disconnected, notice where the rest of the EDP cable runs through. You know what's coming next...

     

    2016-02-03 18.23.12.jpg
    Notice the little screw covers along the hinge? Simple to remove. All it takes is a finger-tip. No knife or 
    poking utensil. It's secured with a very light adhesive. Just put your finger at the very top of the square and "scrape" the edge in a downwards motion, so-to-speak. It may cause the square to curve a bit but it's perfectly replant-able. It may stick to you once removed so put it somewhere that's dust or lint free for re-application. I personally placed these squares on the dummy SD card. The screws underneath are unique so place them somewhere safe in the meantime.


    2016-02-03 18.24.28.jpgGet out that oh-so-important prying utensil! While not in complete focus, notice the out edge near the tab, use your tool there. Note, not IN the same space but to slot bordering the frame. It's also best to start at the bottom when applying pressure. Don't be afraid to go a little deeper to begin frame removal, the screen is more centered then the image here will allow you to see. Another shot to follow.

    2016-02-03 18.27.10.jpg
    Have a better idea where to start prying now? When you starting opening, go natural. It will come loose in a series of "pops" as the connectors are little circulars between the face plate and the body. When working your way around the camera don't be afraid if it's a little stubborn. The plastic frame in this area is a little more flexible. Use reasonable force. Especially when finally making your way back towards the hinge and noticing the light stubbornness.

    2016-02-03 18.28.16.jpg
    This should be what you're affronted with next if all went well. Notice the four screws and holsters around each edge. We'll take a closer look.

     

    2016-02-03 18.28.28.jpg
    Here's the screw and holster on the upper-left side. See the little stick poking through? When securing your 4K AUO screen be sure the stick goes through it. I won't show the right-side because that'd be a little too redundant so lets look at the bottom screws for the panel.

    2016-02-03 18.28.35.jpg
    Bottom-left

    2016-02-03 18.28.38.jpg
    Bottom-right

    2016-02-03 18.30.19.jpg
    Now that we've identified, place a soft preferably foam material down between the screen and the base of the machine. Lean the screen back to reduce the chance of it unintentionally flopping forwards once unscrewed. Follow-suit and then gently lean the screen forwards and then lie it down. I wouldn't use only a single hand especially if your panel is still perfectly-fine. Be careful from herein if you weren't already.

    2016-02-03 18.32.06.jpg
    The back frame w/o the screen. You can see all the connections here from the camera to the lighting assortment.
     

     

    2016-02-03 18.32.09.jpg
    The Screen lying down on the foam spread. Keep you eyes on the pin connector placement jut below the right side of the hinge since we brought it forwards. Now even closer...

    2016-02-03 18.32.13.jpg
    Lift the clear tap from the back of the panel first. I'd recommend using a paper-clip or forceps to ensure it isn't ruined because of finger residue or dust.

    2016-02-03 18.32.40.jpg

    Disconnected from the screen. Now disconnect your EDP cable from the MOBO as well and keep it safe. Now for the new 4K EDP cable.

    2016-02-03 17.21.45.jpg
    Just what you need! Also, here's a link for purchase yourself:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Clevo-P870D...e-/131718160828?&_trksid=p2056016.m2516.l5255

    A standalone currently sets you back $169 USD excluding shipment costs. In case you're unsure about the re-seller, they're called Razorsedgehttp://stores.ebay.com/razorsedgebyeurocomnotebooks/
    They seem to be a direct Eurocom correspondent if not one in the same.

    2016-01-29 03.27.07.jpg
    Now here's the screen you need! The 4K AUO (3840 x 2160) screen; model number B173ZAN01.0. A link to all info available on the panel:http://www.panelook.com/B173ZAN01.0_AUO_17.3_LCM_overview_25358.html

    Also for purchase: http://www.ebay.com/itm/AUO-B173ZAN...43-94mm-LCD-/111894039402?hash=item1a0d678b6a

    It'll set you back $625 USD though there are certainly ways to find it cheaper than what's on offer here. ;)

     

     

    2016-02-03 18.38.47.jpgLay it as see on the foam and connect the EDP cable. Remove the piece of plastic from over the stick portion of the tape and at last, secure the pin cable to the screen and MOBO if you haven't already. 

    2016-02-03 18.47.00.jpg

    After extensive surgery the phoenix can now begin to adjust to its new, ultra clarity 1000:1 face. :p Put your phoenix back together in reverse order and then the true journey can begin! :D When you first try to reboot the laptop it may take a little while longer so don't be afraid if it's not SSD level boot speed! As I can confirm you WILL lose G-sync in the Nvidia control panel though in the bios you will still have the "-G" moniker. And thus far panel overclocking is not extensive compared to the FHD though I've been trying to see if that is at all possible especially if down-scaling the resolution and then opting to run at 100Hz or more. Hope I was able to help those who wanted to make the upgradeicon1.png as well. Enjoy your 4K guys!!!

     

     

     

    Continue discussion of guide here. 


      Report Article
    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback




    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Mr. Mac
      Hi, I would like to modify when the CPU fan starts on my P150SM. I understand that this can be done by flashing the BIOS with the prema mod. However I cannot find the files. Any idea how to obtain them? premamod.com is a dead-end there nothing but an email input field there.
       
      thx
    • By endray
      Hey guys,
      I recently upgraded my M15x with a i7 920XM and a GTX 780M.
      Flashed the modified vbios, got a 330W brick, pulled the pin, installed newest drivers and did some gaming.
      Everything worked pretty well, only sometimes the 780M reached 93C and clocked down, but still ran stable, never crashed.
      Therefore I decided to get a finer TIM and repaste. Bought the Noctua NT-H1, carefully repasted and voila, temps dropped around 15C.
      But here comes the catch: when trying Furmark or some very intensive game, the GPU reaches 88C and screen immediately turns a random color. No downclocking, no limiting, just a sudden crash. Only thing I can do is a hard reset. This doesnt happen on any other occasion, can game on 80C for an hour.

      Do you guys have any sort of idea why the laptop crashes at 88C, while before it worked at 90+ without a problem?

      Things I tried:
      Used DDU and reinstalled the drivers, also tried older version.
      CMOS reset.
      Cleaned everything, no dust left anywhere.
      Carefully checked the GPU for any visible damage or old TIM residue.
      Tried undervolting and underclocking, only took longer to get to 88C and still crashed.
      For the sake of it I actually strapped a Corsair H45 AIO to the GPU heatsink. Now i get to max 55C with furmark, but the laptop still cashes after around 2 minutes.
       
      I would be happy for any suggestion, thanks!
    • By ahumayun22
      Hi People reading this post,

      I've been having so many problems with the P640RE Def ||
      but in the last week or so random shutdowns while idle or gaming, I suspect it is motherboard 'cause when it shutdowns and I try to turn it back on it doesn't and have to wait some seconds also the charger needs to be replugged. On time varies for some reason. Sometimes it's 5 minutes or 8 hours?!!?!

      Google Fu is useless here!

      Thx,
      Abdullah
    • By Rappid Rabbit
      i was wanting to upgrade my clevo p151sm1(not -a) that has a gtx 765m to a 970m or 965m and wondering if its possible to do before i go buying the gpu and have it not work (cpu is i5 4300m)
    • By mocji117
      Hi, I got a Sager NP8278 (Clevo P170SM) with a gtx970m 6GB. is there a way to have SLI or what are my upgrade options for the video card?
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.