Jump to content

High_Voltage

Registered User (Promoted)
  • Content Count

    78
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    19

High_Voltage last won the day on December 15

High_Voltage had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

38 Semi Elite

About High_Voltage

  • Rank
    T|I Semi Advanced

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    @Zakyn I'm not sure. Guessing that @gerald has experimentally determined that out of the two possible reset pins this one is the right one. Actually, I'm also currently designing an Ultrabay adapter. In my design I decided to go for @gerald's choice of Reset pin, but pull it up to the standby +3V (pin 64 on Lenovo schematic). There is already a pull-up on the motherboard for this pin, I've added this one just in case. Probably going to try with this pull-up unpopulated first...
  2. High_Voltage

    Lenovo Y410p/Y510p BIOS mod to enable Nvidia eGPU support

    Speaking of RAM, there should be a pair of pads under the black sticker behind RAM sticks. Shorting these together with tweezers will reset CMOS too. Of course it will be no help if you managed to initiate emergency reflash and interrupted it mid-way, damaging the BIOS flash contents.
  3. High_Voltage

    Lenovo Y410p/Y510p BIOS mod to enable Nvidia eGPU support

    I would strongly recommend trying different flash drive. Preferably with USB2.0, activity LED and small size like 4GB or so.
  4. High_Voltage

    Lenovo Y410p/Y510p BIOS mod to enable Nvidia eGPU support

    Do you have access to another computer? Can you make sure the Yx01.bin file is in the root of the flash drive and the flash drive is formatted in FAT32? If these conditions are satisfied and you've performed the procedure described in the original post correctly, the computer should be able to pick the file up and reflash itself. Pay attention that you need to plug the drive into specific USB port. You generally need to hold the buttons for about a minute and then let it sit for about 10 minutes or so to do its thing. If your flash drive has an LED, you'll immediately see whether the computer is reading files or whether it has failed. Anyway, I'd try the @Klem's advice first. This is a more sensible thing to try in this situation.
  5. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    @jxfong2 You'll need to power the laptop with its own power brick and the eGPU with a separate desktop power supply. Also, keep in mind that RTX2070 has not been tested with this adapter, so there's a chance it won't work. @manolis Unfortunately, you can't use a regular SATA 2.5'' drive caddy for connecting to Ultrabay socket. The Ultrabay system doesn't use SATA connector inside the bay, but rather a separate high-speed PCI-e x8 socket located next to it. It is buying the plug part for this socket (cheap and in low quantities) that is a problem right now.
  6. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think these connectors are for the wrong side (this would be the same as the one on the motherboard, not the one on the ultrabay device).
  7. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    @rusTORK The ADT solutions implement PCI-E x4 by making use of the PCI-E lines available in the m.2 NVMe connectors. Although Y510p does have an m.2 port, it does not support NVMe and therefore doesn't have any PCI-E lines in there.
  8. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    @Swung Huang Please take your time, your life is much more important than this. I'm sure some of us will easily wait 'till June (especially because by then the RTX cards will drop in price). @Pushendu This thing will work on many laptops, including the Y510P (probably, you'll have to flash a version of BIOS with white list removed). The problem with these is that they only give you PCI-E x1, whereas the Ultrabay adapter is capable of PCI-E x8.
  9. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    I think it shouldn't be much of a problem for say @Swung Huang to manufacture and sell these adapters while sourcing the connectors locally in China. Especially because he seems to have already designed / reverse-engineered functional PCBs in several different arrangements (one-piece and cable-tied versions). Not sure what is currently stopping him from doing that. Possibly, the demand is not high enough. Although, if people here confirmed that they are ready to pay @gerald's original price for the thing, this could well be a different story... You don't seem to understand. The problem lies nor in the PCI-E socket of the adapter, neither in the PCB manufacturing costs. It is the bit that connects to the laptop's motherboard INSIDE the ultrabay slot, that is utilizing a custom proprietary connector. If one could find a place to purchase these connectors easily, the rest is quite straightforward and (relatively) cheap. One could potentially even design a small PCB with the connector to go inside ultrabay slot, which would break it out into a bunch of high-frequency biaxial cables that you can then solder directly to the PCI-E socket pins on the back of one of those small PCI-E boards you've linked.
  10. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    The problem is not with the design. The problem is with finding where to buy those proprietary connectors for the ultrabay. If there is no way of getting them separately, people will have to desolder them from their own GPU modules and install them on blank PCBs, and this requires quite a lot of skill.
  11. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    Hi, @Zakyn, I had a look at your schematic. Not really going to check your routing to the PCI-E pinout, let's hope it is correct. Also, I hope that you are aware that the high-speed PCI-E lanes have to be routed in differential pairs with length matching (KiCad has a special feature for that) (also make sure to match the length among all the pairs). Now, speaking of the necessary pull-up resistors on the Lenovo side, as it has already been shown by @gerald while I was writing this response, here's the situation with the additional resistors and circuits: 1k pull-up to +3V at pin 70 of the Ultrabay (pin SUSP# in Lenovo motherboard schematic), this is R4 in Gerald's schematic. (note that Gerald's schematic uses different pin numeration for some reason) R1, R5 and R6 are not installed on Gerald's adapter board, so you can just ignore them. These pins although labelled sensibly, don't appear to make any difference to ultrabay functionality R2 used to be installed in V2 of the adapter, but in order for it to work properly, this pin must be open. Do not install! 1k pull-down to ground from Ultrabay pin 94 (SLAVE_PRESENT#), this is R3 in Gerald's schematic Wire Ultrabay pin 98 (PLT_RST#) to PCI-E Reset pin, additionally pulling the signal up to +3V3 (that comes from your power supply) To summarise, out of all of the resistors, you only need two (R4 and R3), plus the Reset circuit. Also, you don't have to route SMB bus to the PCI-E slot as it is redundant. Better make solder pads for it so it can be used with my hardware mod.
  12. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    @Zakyn If you send me your schematic, I might be able to help you with it.
  13. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    Does it offer any optimus-related options? Also, when right-clicking any game shortcut, do you now get an option whether to run it with intel or high performance nvidia gpu? Also, do you have intel drivers installed?
  14. High_Voltage

    Y510p Ultrabay Graphics card

    Is this on a y500 or y510p? On a y510p you should keep Intel graphics enabled for the Optimus to work. On y500 internal screen acceleration isn't really possible at all...
  15. High_Voltage

    Lenovo Y410p/Y510p BIOS mod to enable Nvidia eGPU support

    Hi! I honestly don't think your issue is caused by the whitelist. Whitelist usually only applies to wireless-capable devices, which an SSD is not. I suspect whitelisting wireless devices simplifies the FCC certification process to Lenovo or something on these lines... Your issue is most likely caused by the fact that you have purchased an NVMe SSD, while these old laptops only support msata in the m.2 port. This aside, the patchers should be in the same archive everything else is in. The reasons to mod your own BIOS rather than using someone else's are to retain your Windows key and keep original ME region in place (this is something you really don't want to mess with unless you know what you're doing). The Backup Toolkit should be the real deal unless the link I have provided ages ago now leads to something malicious...
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.