Jump to content
EwinRacing Flash Series Gaming Chairs

mumblepins

Registered User (Pre-Promotion)
  • Content Count

    4
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Semi Elite

About mumblepins

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 12/11/1985
  1. One main advantage of NAS specific hard drives is that they "give up" trying to read much faster when a bad sector is detected. Standard consumer drives assume a bad sector is the only location of that data piece, so try multiple times in many different ways to read it successfully. However, enterprise or NAS drives in general are part of some sort of redundant array (RAID, ZFS, etc.), and if a sector on one disk goes bad, it's not a big deal, so it quickly marks the sector as bad and rebuilds it from other data. This doesn't slow down the whole array much, and the RAID logic won't mark the whole drive as bad, whereas with a consumer drive the slow down on read time may get the whole drive marked as bad. As Presjar says, the warranty is also part of the cost difference. FWIW though, I've been using WD Green drives without any troubles in RAID array for several years. If super high uptime requirements aren't necessary, you can just tell the RAID controller to have a longer timeout on marking a drive bad, and get away from the problem mentioned earlier.
  2. Hi everyone, I have a Y510P with the 750M SLI option, and I'd really like to be able to switch out occasionally for a blu-ray drive. Does anyone know of a source for the bluray ultrabay drive, or even better, an optical drive caddy (were these even made?) Thanks!!
  3. I have a desktop with 8 gb of ram, but I'd really like to upgrade it to 16gb. Unfortunately I'm a little cash-poor right now, so I've been planning on waiting until the price of DDR3 ram comes down. However, it seems like that may never happen, looking at the price graph here, and I should have bought some more a year or so ago when I originally built this computer :-( Does anyone think that with DDR4 coming into play, the price of DDR3 will start going down? Thanks!
  4. What sort of business? If it involves travel and taking notes that may be convenient to write, I'd take a look at Surface Pro. If you want a bigger screen, Lenovo is a great place to look. I'm partial to the T-series personally. And I'd spend a good chunk of that money on getting the SSD option on whatever laptop you get, as these days I feel like that makes a bigger difference for business things than anything else.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.