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squinks

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squinks last won the day on July 29 2014

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About squinks

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  1. +1 The III-D issues arose during my SLI project but not with a single GPU. Sounds like it is a Maxwell issue. Side note: @Tech Inferno Fan, I noticed the peformance board says III-D for my SLI listing. It was 2 SELs. Anyway, I hope everyone here is making progress. I've been lost in PS4 land. K I'm out : )
  2. squinks

    DIY eGPU Macbook experiences

    Well, without a 2013 or newer MBP, you will not be able to just install windows and expect things to work. The hardware won't support it. Your only alternative on a 2012 rMBP is eGPU 1.3 - From what I understand, this will allow you to create a boot option that allows you to configure the PCIe interfaces. I takes some know how and that's why I'm glad I never had to mess with any of that. You want my real advice? Sell your MBP and get a newer model. It will save you from what I can only predict will be serious headaches. Unless you enjoy that sort of thing. I like to hack, shoot I even persisted until I solved and created the world's first eGPU SLI solution which took months of revisions to do, that was a massive pain but I had the right hardware. Furthermore, why would you want an eGPU @10Gbps anyway. That's a really crappy bottleneck that limits you to nothing more than a GTX 760. Anyway, just my 2 cents. Best of luck! - - - Updated - - - I see. Yeah I'm the same, sold everything. I have yet to see OSX gaming with an eGPU
  3. Yeah, I can imagine a drop in stability with only the III-D's PSU. Does it freeze? What happens exactly. And it is only during max load?
  4. squinks

    DIY eGPU Macbook experiences

    On a 2012 MBP, you'll most likely have to use nando's eGPU software. I never used it and don't know much about it. Search the forums to find others who have done this. Your Akitio chassis is also another factor that I don't know anything about. Hopefully there's a way to make it all work. - - - Updated - - - Unfortunately, no. It's not possible. At least, not one has found a way yet. When Windows sees the dGPU, it completely disables the iGPU, thus, no Optimus. - - - Updated - - - How are you powering the eGPU without a PSU?
  5. I just used standard risers. A tight fit when the cards are upright but options were limited.
  6. I have a 15" MBP but not an Iris-only. The project was merely to prove what was thought to be impossible. The 13" MBP is what it is. Most importantly, doors have been opened for the future of eGPU.
  7. squinks

    US$314 Sonnet Echo Express SEL (16Gbps-TB2)

    Your setup should work. I have the SEL + 780 Ti. For PnP, you will need a standard bootcamp install of Windows 8.1 See this post (The setup is for the III-D but pretend it's the SEL): http://forum.techinferno.com/diy-e-gpu-projects/6689-%5Bguide%5D-2013-15-macbook-pro-gtx780ti%4016gbps-tb2-sonnet-echo-express-iii-d-win8.html#post91182 And if you're curious, I just posted a first ever, SLI setup: http://forum.techinferno.com/diy-e-gpu-projects/7326-sli-success-2x-780ti-2x-sonnet-sel-macbook-pro-%4032gbps-tb2-2x-16gbps.html#post100318 For OSX, yes, you would see need modified kext files. See the OSX86 community for those answers
  8. 7-Jan-2015 Tech Inferno Fan>> originally it was thought that this configuration would provide 32Gbps of performance. Unfortunately that is not the case due to the Thunderbolt chip being hosted off a x4 2.0 bus, limiting performance to 16Gbps as noted. I'm excited to unveil the first ever (to my knowledge) eGPU SLI configuration. 2x 780 Ti's + 2x Sonnet SEL's running on a 2013 MacBook Pro. This was thought to be impossible, in fact Nando and I were certain it was a lost cause, but I was determined to prove otherwise. Thousands of dollars and months later, it happened.There are a number of factors that went into making this possible. The combination of hardware is the most important. The other key ingredients include software and a particular boot process that until discovered almost put an end to the whole project. As much as I would enjoy keeping this information to myself, I will happily disclose everything I know for any other lunatics out there that want to create the ultimate eGPU solution.Configuration:2013 13" MacBook Pro (15" preferred) *Iris-only graphics required!2x EVGA 780 Ti (Any matching EVGA GTX cards should work)2x Sonnet SELCorsair RM450 PSU w/2x 8pin to 8+6pinWindows 8.1External display (Optimus is not an option with SLI)*Secret step for SLI (revealed below)*Secret boot process (revealed below) – Performance Results – 3DMark 11SLI Graphics score: 22095 linkSingle 780Ti score: 125763DMark - Fire StrikeSLI Graphics score: 19395 linkSingle 780Ti score: 104103DMark06*Older benchmarks would not run with both GPUsGamesAlmost every game experienced CPU bottleneck on the 13" MBPThe above benchmarks provided static rendering and thus realistic SLI results*Please do not request benchmarks on specific games, I do nothave a 15" Iris-only MBP to give you a legitimate GPU-centric result,however, just like the benchmarks, I'm confident the results would be impressiveCUDA-Z Bandwidth (TB Device 1 and 2)Host to Device: ~1250 MiB/sDevice to Host: ~1360 MiB/sDevice to Device: ~135 GiB/s– The Secret Sauce –1. HyperSLI 1.0 (installation is simple, adds a boot option)2. Boot process:- Shutdown (not a restart)- Unplug TB cables- Wait 10 seconds- Plug in TB cable #1- Wait 10 seconds- Boot Mac and hold alt- Wait 5-10 seconds- Plug in TB cable #2- Select Windows and choose HyperSLI boot option- Should work! Open Nvidia Control Panel and enable SLI– Limitations –- CPU. 15" w/maximum quad-core CPU will provide the best SLI performance- Games that require more CPU will experience capped FPS quickly- GPUs in SLI crunch massive amounts of data @32Gbps and low-spec CPUs will not keep up- MBPs w/Iris-only graphics is required. MBP w/discrete GPU + 2 eGPUs will not boot or will result in a Code 12- External display required- Optimus is not an option. Believe me, I tried
  9. You could absolutely use an ITX case to fit everything in. I thought of doing something like that myself.
  10. I would go SEL. I have proven that SEL has Optimus out of the box on Iris-only MBPs. The SE II and III-D have a PLX chip (PCIe switching for circuit boards with more than one slot) that restricts the ability to use your internal display without hassle.
  11. @Tech Inferno Fan Indeed. Intel is crazy protective about this stuff.
  12. @Tech Inferno Fan Interesting. Yes, someone would have to test it. So that leads me to ask, what is the advantage then over a Sonnet SEL?
  13. @Tech Inferno Fan Just confirmed the III-D does indeed have a PLX chip. Not easy to peak under but at the right angle, there it is clear as day, "PLX". The SEL does not as you would imagine. Both the III-D and SEL have the appropriate slot for the ASUS ThunderboltEX II. Only question is what that header is for. Is it for power? Why is a PLX chip necessary if used with the SEL board? Either way, my guess is Sonnet could not sell you a PCIe board legally and even if they did, it would not be cheap.
  14. @Tech Inferno Fan Wow. That's a very interesting part there. Not sure what I'm look for on the III-D board. The proprietary ASUS connector is a bit worrisome but if it works.. and if a PCIe board was obtainable from Sonnet, it would make for an interesting project. Any takers out there? : )
  15. @Tech Inferno Fan @Relentless By the way, the TB port closest to the magsafe thing, completely not true. I updated the steps which are essentially: shutdown, plug or re-plug eGPU, boot into Windows.. Optimus enabled!
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