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IdeaPad y510p Excessive Battery Drain

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EDIT: The latest (and only) BIOS update to 3.05 seemed to have fixed this. Only 1% drain overnight. I was on 1.10... a little disappointing that 3.05 only made it to the website last month, being dated from September of last year and all...

Hi everyone,

I'm having an issue with my y510p where the battery drains at a rate of about 20% overnight with the system off and disconnected from AC power. It's totally off, not standby/sleep. Nothing is connected to it. I've tried the following:

- Disable USB charging function in BIOS

- Disable wake-on-LAN features of the network and wireless adapters (N-2230)

- Disable fast boot/hibernation

- Uninstall Intel Bluetooth driver, revert to Microsoft Bluetooth stack

- Clean install of Windows 8, Windows 7, and Ubuntu 14.04 (doesn't matter which OS I have installed)

Does anyone have any other ideas on what could be happening? I've read on the Lenovo forums that people have sent their systems in for replacement motherboards and still experience this issue. I'm out of ideas on what else to do. Wanted to try as much as I could before resorting to sending it in for a repair that might not do anything.

Thanks!

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