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Noisy fan even on very low RPM, temps are fine

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I got a Clevo laptop, W355SS about a year ago. Everything has been going fine, but lately the fan has started to make too much noise. It's probably something structural, as I opened it up, cleaned everything from dust and re-applied thermal paste.

Temperatures went down considerably (15-20 degrees in idle mode). This made the problem better when idling because the fan never turns on, but as soon as the fan starts even in its slowest mode, considerable noise is being made, disproportionate to the speed.

Do you guys have any tips on how to improve this? It has to be something structural, maybe sth in the axis (dust?), but I don't know how to remove the fanblades. I opened the fan up and I don't know if I am able to remove the fan itself, as it seems to be held on its axis without screws, and it is plastic. Do you have in mind any tutorials for Clevo fans and heatsinks? Any website where I might be able to get a cheap replacement or a better heatsing and/or fan?

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