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Cooling Pad - Not cooling

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I can also vouch for the Zalman NC2000. It keeps my ill-designed Toshiba Satellite from cooking itself to death. Before getting the pad, both CPU and GPU temps would frequently go above 85 degrees under heavy gaming. With the Zalman NC2000 it actually does run about 10 degrees cooler then under load, and 5 degrees cooler when idle.

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I have the same laptop and I have also the same heat issues. I've bought the same laptop cooler because of the modding ability. The problem of the Y500 is the poor vent-construction. What I want to do is drill small holes in the bottom cover to let more air in. I have tested my Y500 carefully with and without the bottom cover, and with no laptop cooler under the laptop. I put 2 small boxes underneath the Y500.

These were the results:

Results with bottom cover:

CPU 82C

GPU 93C

Results without bottom cover:

CPU 73C

GPU 77C

There is an other solution to transfer heat out but that's to risky for me. You can use washers to tighten the CPU and GPU to the heatsink. I called Lenovo to order a bottom cover but they will call me back. After that I will begin modding the bottom cover and the cooling pad.

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I have the same as you and I have noticed a massive decrease in my CPU and GPU temperatures.

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I think I'm going to leave the bottom open and put some furniture pads under my Y500...

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I think I'm going to leave the bottom open and put some furniture pads under my Y500...

Here is what I use, I made it using some feet i salvaged from an old dvd/vcr player and then I cut this rubber ball I bought at target for 1$ in half and attached it to them. xD. I will show you my funny cooling setup when I get home, it involves a box some pvc pipes using a "forced air" setup. Google Forced air laptop cooler to find a guide that some guy did that was similar.

post-13091-14494996414372_thumb.jpg

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Here is what I use, I made it using some feet i salvaged from an old dvd/vcr player and then I cut this rubber ball I bought at target for 1$ in half and attached it to them. xD. I will show you my funny cooling setup when I get home, it involves a box some pvc pipes using a "forced air" setup. Google Forced air laptop cooler to find a guide that some guy did that was similar.

Haha, that's good! I googled that 'Forced Air Laptop Cooler' - that is quite extreme, reminds me very slightly of a setup on my own car! Would be interesting to see some pics of your setup, what kind of difference does it make to the temperatures?

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Haha, that's good! I googled that 'Forced Air Laptop Cooler' - that is quite extreme, reminds me very slightly of a setup on my own car! Would be interesting to see some pics of your setup, what kind of difference does it make to the temperatures?

I had the setup going, but I could not make it effective enough. The fans I had sitting around I wanted to use on it were Silverstone 180mm air penetrators which are complete beasts, but they are also huge. So the issue I ran into was trying to keep the pvc pipes small enough so my laptop was not a foot off the ground and also get enough air pressure into the pipes. If you ever tried to push a lot of air into a small space it does not go well. So I tried constructing some sort of small box to hold the fans and then using a bag to connect to the pipes. I did get decent air pressure but it was too big and messy to keep on my desk. I recently took apart an old Dell Poweredge rack server and took out some high RPM 40mm Nidec fans so I might try doing something with those. I have found no matter what I do it does not cool well unless it is high pressure directed air right at the intakes on my laptop. Too bad I can't replace the fan on my Lenovo y500 easily.

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I had the setup going, but I could not make it effective enough. The fans I had sitting around I wanted to use on it were Silverstone 180mm air penetrators which are complete beasts, but they are also huge. So the issue I ran into was trying to keep the pvc pipes small enough so my laptop was not a foot off the ground and also get enough air pressure into the pipes. If you ever tried to push a lot of air into a small space it does not go well. So I tried constructing some sort of small box to hold the fans and then using a bag to connect to the pipes. I did get decent air pressure but it was too big and messy to keep on my desk. I recently took apart an old Dell Poweredge rack server and took out some high RPM 40mm Nidec fans so I might try doing something with those. I have found no matter what I do it does not cool well unless it is high pressure directed air right at the intakes on my laptop. Too bad I can't replace the fan on my Lenovo y500 easily.

Haha, yes, that setup with the bag does sound kind of crazy, no wonder you couldn't live with that on your desk! It's fun to mess around with these things though!

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I have u3 on my AW 18 which perfect match SLI GPU and CPU. 5 fans are useless because the r not under original fans anyway so just making extra noise. Anyway for me stock U3 reduce temps +/- 5deg. BF4 on ultra warm up my GPU to ~78deg. which is ok. Better result will be if are able to put Air condition exhaust under ur laptop;p Imo Cooling pad is not made to reduce temps by 10degs or more.

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And I use two caps after a bottle of water as a base for the laptop. Thanks to this laptop has more space for air intake hence the temperature drops by 5-7 C without extra noise. And the price is 0$.

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Haha, yes, that setup with the bag does sound kind of crazy, no wonder you couldn't live with that on your desk! It's fun to mess around with these things though!

Yeah, I can mess around with these things for hours on end. I find the idea of how air pressure works very interesting. I was playing around with making a vacuum for my exhaust, working off the idea of this product Amazon.com: Mini Vacuum USB Air Extracting Cooling Fan Cooler for Notebook Laptop - Ships from USA warehouse in CA: Computers & Accessories

It is basically just a blower fan that uses it's intake as your computers side exhaust. I actually bought this product for a few dollars and gave it a try. It was okay, on a less powerful laptop it could actually make a difference. Only thing is it is kind of cheap and plastic. Anyway the idea of how it works intrigued me, so I took a small delta fan that is shaped like a blower fan, but it sort of has the fins in a way like a fan on a GPU where it can push air all around it. Anyway I encircled it and attached it to a small box and it is pretty cool how well it works.

It is a fan similar to the picture I attached, cool stuff. It is also pretty cool how pretty much all electronics can be powered by just a power and ground cable. It may seem obvious if you have already learned about circuits and stuff but to figure it out yourself is much more enjoyable.

post-13091-14494996469263_thumb.jpg

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I'm in the middle of modifying a CM Notepal U3 with desktop fans and drilling bigger holes, will make a thread when I've made more progress :)

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Have you tried turning in the fan by itself and putting your hand over it? Just to check how good the air flow is, because most cooling pads are so derpedly manufactured they don't realise to get a high air flow the pad cant be adjacent to the table. Try holding the pad in the air and turning it on, if you still feel no air rushing through that... Its definitely the RPM and how the fan grills are made.

but tbh that fan set up looks over killed, I think you only problem is where those fans are getting their air from.. Also take into consideration if your room temp is hot that isn't gonna help much, best of luck

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1.)Get a laptop cooler.

2.)Invert it.

3.)Put gel pads on it to elevate laptop even higher when placed upon it.

4.)Cut through the rear panel of the laptop to expose the heatsinks of both cpu and gpu.

5.)Place velco around the hole you cut.

6.)Buy 2x thermaltake mobile II fans mod them so they are attachable to the bottom using Velcro. You have to reverse the position of the fan speed controller to allow the fans to push air up instead of sucking air out.

Voila nearly 100cfm of extra airflow and enough clearance to allow the fans to work properly. With my M15x I can run Prime 95 for hours at 24x (3,2ghz) across all 8 threads small ffts with max temp of 80C on hottest core. Ambient temp 20C. 7970M at 950/1450 at 1.05V hits again maximum 67C in so far both FC3 and Crysis 3 both at full settings 1080p. End of story. If you want to lower temperatures this is the easiest and most cost effective way of doing it.

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50-70c is the safe threshold for laptop internals. My laptop never goes above 55c even when I'm using very demanding programs (thank you ssd) and I always felt like lap coolers like that were a little frivolous and unnecessary.

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