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Clevo P650SE/ Sager NP8651 BIOS mod for ssd NVMe boot drive

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hi

i have clevo p650se and i just installed m.2 nvme 1tb drive and cloned it

i've searched the web and found out that i can't boot from it unless i mod my bios.

can someone me help find a mod for my bios? and maybe a manual for flashing it?

my current version is 1.03.04RNS1

thank you very very much!

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On 6/2/2022 at 9:32 AM, avis said:

hi

i have clevo p650se and i just installed m.2 nvme 1tb drive and cloned it

i've searched the web and found out that i can't boot from it unless i mod my bios.

can someone me help find a mod for my bios? and maybe a manual for flashing it?

my current version is 1.03.04RNS1

thank you very very much!

Hi!

Yes, with modified bios, your laptop should be support NVME SSD. But you will need to install a new Windows 10 on your NVMe disk. (not clone from old disk !!!).

  • Important:

    • The “BOOT” section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the “Bootable Devices” will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
    • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as “Windows Boot Manager”.
  • Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:

    • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
    • Create an UEFI mode bootable USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the latest version of the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
      Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:

      Important note: Usually the USB Flash Drive has to be FAT32 formatted to be bootable in UEFI mode, but this file system cannot be created, if any file within the ISO file (e.g. the install.wim) is bigger sized than 4 GB. In this case the tool Rufus will automatically format the USB Flash Drive by using the NTFS file system, but nevertheless makes it possible to boot the USB Flash Drive in UEFI mode (provided, that the “Secure Boot” option within the BIOS has been set to “Disabled”).
    • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the “BOOT” section and - if applicable - the “SECURITY” or “Keys” section.
      Make sure, that the “Secure Boot” and “Fast Boot” options are disabled. The “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM) can either be set to “Disabled” as well (better option, but requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to “Enabled” with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives. If you see BIOS options for the “OS type”, choose “other OS”. This will disable the Secure Boot setting.
    • Tip to avoid SATA/NVMe interferences during the OS installation:
      It is recommended to temporarily unplug all SATA connected devices and additionally to disable the on-board SATA Controller(s) within the “Storage Configuration” section of the BIOS before starting the OS installation.
      These measures of precaution can/should be reversed once the OS installation onto the NVMe SSD has been successfully completed.
    • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix “[UEFI]”).
    • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
    • The rest should be done by the Setup automatically. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
    • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
    • Before you restart your computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed “Windows Boot Manager” is on top of the bootable storage drives.

 

 

 

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OK. But where can I find the modified bios and manual for installing it? 

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4 hours ago, avis said:

OK. But where can I find the modified bios and manual for installing it? 

Each bios mod prepared individually and based on your personal file backup of bios.

You can post here your file backup of bios, or upload it into any fileserver and post the link.

For creating backup of bios use attached utility. Extract attached archive directly on the Desktop and run utility as Administrator (right click mouse, choice "Run as Administrator"). Utility will create archive "results" directly on the Desktop. Post here this archive "results", or upload it into any fileserver and send me the link.


https://files.fm/u/nzwynejau

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3 hours ago, P650SE User said:

Hi @Klem I was wondering if you were able to help me with NVMe boot support as well please?

I have already provided the results.rar for you :)

 

Thanks!

 

https://www.sendspace.com/file/gwl0ty

Hi!

Ok. Your bios with NVMe support done. Check PM.

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26 minutes ago, P650SE User said:

Worked perfectly!!! Thank you so much! <3

Ok. Thanks for your feedback.

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Hi everyone.
I have the same issue with my Clevo P651SE and Samsung 850 EVO M.2. So can I also ask You for help, please? The link to backup utility (https://files.fm/u/nzwynejau) has expired. Could You update the link please? Thank You so much.

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14 hours ago, nyquister said:

Hi everyone.
I have the same issue with my Clevo P651SE and Samsung 850 EVO M.2. So can I also ask You for help, please? The link to backup utility (https://files.fm/u/nzwynejau) has expired. Could You update the link please? Thank You so much.

Hi!

Samsung 850 EVO M.2 - it is not NVMe SSD disk, it is SATA SSD disk. So, to use Samsung 850 EVO M.2 you don't need NVMe support.

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2 hours ago, Klem said:

Hi!

Samsung 850 EVO M.2 - it is not NVMe SSD disk, it is SATA SSD disk. So, to use Samsung 850 EVO M.2 you don't need NVMe support.

 

Yes, sorry for my mistake, this is Samsung SSD 980 m.2 NVMe (no 850, like I wrote). My brain fails sometimes after two covid-19 infections...

Edited by nyquister

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4 hours ago, clevop650se user said:

Hi @Klem, my bios file are missing, is it possible to upgrade my ssd to nvme, i have 512gb, nvme (from asus strix) is it compatible?

Hi!

What the laptop moddel?

What happens if you install your SSD 512gb, nvme (from asus strix)?

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16 hours ago, Klem said:

Hi!

What the laptop moddel?

What happens if you install your SSD 512gb, nvme (from asus strix)?

my laptop model is clevo p650se

Edited by clevop650se user

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4 hours ago, clevop650se user said:

 

my laptop model is clevo p650se

Ok. What happens now if you install your SSD 512gb, nvme (from asus strix)?

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6 hours ago, Klem said:

Ok. What happens now if you install your SSD 512gb, nvme (from asus strix)?

 when first instal its normal, but when the second boot, it cannot boot from ssd, it back to the first instalation

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2 minutes ago, clevop650se user said:

 when first instal its normal, but when the second boot, it cannot boot from ssd, it back to the first instalation

  • Important:

    • The “BOOT” section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the “Bootable Devices” will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
    • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as “Windows Boot Manager”.
  • Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:

    • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
    • Create an UEFI mode bootable USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the latest version of the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
      Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:
      Important note: Usually the USB Flash Drive has to be FAT32 formatted to be bootable in UEFI mode, but this file system cannot be created, if any file within the ISO file (e.g. the install.wim) is bigger sized than 4 GB. In this case the tool Rufus will automatically format the USB Flash Drive by using the NTFS file system, but nevertheless makes it possible to boot the USB Flash Drive in UEFI mode (provided, that the “Secure Boot” option within the BIOS has been set to “Disabled”).
    • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the “BOOT” section and - if applicable - the “SECURITY” or “Keys” section.
      Make sure, that the “Secure Boot” and “Fast Boot” options are disabled. The “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM) can either be set to “Disabled” as well (better option, but requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to “Enabled” with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives. If you see BIOS options for the “OS type”, choose “other OS”. This will disable the Secure Boot setting.
    • Tip to avoid SATA/NVMe interferences during the OS installation:
      It is recommended to temporarily unplug all SATA connected devices and additionally to disable the on-board SATA Controller(s) within the “Storage Configuration” section of the BIOS before starting the OS installation.
      These measures of precaution can/should be reversed once the OS installation onto the NVMe SSD has been successfully completed.
    • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix “[UEFI]”).
    • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
    • The rest should be done by the Setup automatically. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
    • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
    • Before you restart your computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed “Windows Boot Manager” is on top of the bootable storage drives.

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47 minutes ago, Klem said:
  • Important:

    • The “BOOT” section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the “Bootable Devices” will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
    • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as “Windows Boot Manager”.
  • Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:

    • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
    • Create an UEFI mode bootable USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the latest version of the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
      Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:
      Important note: Usually the USB Flash Drive has to be FAT32 formatted to be bootable in UEFI mode, but this file system cannot be created, if any file within the ISO file (e.g. the install.wim) is bigger sized than 4 GB. In this case the tool Rufus will automatically format the USB Flash Drive by using the NTFS file system, but nevertheless makes it possible to boot the USB Flash Drive in UEFI mode (provided, that the “Secure Boot” option within the BIOS has been set to “Disabled”).
    • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the “BOOT” section and - if applicable - the “SECURITY” or “Keys” section.
      Make sure, that the “Secure Boot” and “Fast Boot” options are disabled. The “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM) can either be set to “Disabled” as well (better option, but requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to “Enabled” with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives. If you see BIOS options for the “OS type”, choose “other OS”. This will disable the Secure Boot setting.
    • Tip to avoid SATA/NVMe interferences during the OS installation:
      It is recommended to temporarily unplug all SATA connected devices and additionally to disable the on-board SATA Controller(s) within the “Storage Configuration” section of the BIOS before starting the OS installation.
      These measures of precaution can/should be reversed once the OS installation onto the NVMe SSD has been successfully completed.
    • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix “[UEFI]”).
    • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
    • The rest should be done by the Setup automatically. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
    • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
    • Before you restart your computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed “Windows Boot Manager” is on top of the bootable storage drives.

the instalation was normal, it detect ssd, make the partition etc, but in bios mode, the nvme ssd  not appear.

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7 minutes ago, clevop650se user said:

the instalation was normal, it detect ssd, make the partition etc, but in bios mode, the nvme ssd  not appear.

Ok. Check PM.

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