Jump to content
EwinRacing Flash Series Gaming Chairs

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'recover'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Forum Introduction & Feedback
    • Site Announcements, Rules & New Member Intros
    • TechInferno Forum Feedback
  • Tech News & Reviews
    • News & Reviews
  • Notebooks & e-GPU Discussions
    • DIY e-GPU Projects
    • General Notebook Discussions
    • Notebook OEM Subforums
    • What Notebook Best Fits My Needs?
    • Legacy Articles
  • Desktop & General Hardware
    • General Desktops Discussion
    • Desktop Hardware
    • Overclocking, Cooling & Build Logs
  • Software, Networking & PC Gaming
    • PC Gaming
    • Video Driver Releases & Discussion
    • Networking
    • General Software Discussion
  • Everything Else
    • Off Topic

Categories

  • SVL7 & Klem VBIOS Mods
    • AMD
    • Alienware M11x R3
    • Alienware M14x R2
    • Alienware M17x R4
    • Alienware M18x R1
    • Alienware M18x R2
    • Kepler VBIOS
    • Lenovo Y400-Y500
    • Lenovo Y410p-Y510p
    • Lenovo Y580-Y480
    • Legacy BIOS/VBIOS
    • Maxwell VBIOS
    • Sony Vaio SVS13 / SVS15 series
  • BAKED BIOS Mods
    • Clevo
  • Utilities

Product Groups

  • Tech|Inferno Elite Membership
  • Hardware

Categories

  • Frontpage News
    • General News
    • Reviews
    • Hardware News
    • Software News
    • PC Gaming News
    • Science & Technology News
  • Promoted Posts
    • Guides
    • Hardware
    • Software

Categories

  • Hardware
    • Notebooks and Components
    • Desktop and Components
    • Phones
    • Accessories
  • Software
    • PC Games
    • All Other Software

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Steam


AIM


MSN


Website URL


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Occupation

Found 2 results

  1. There are several reasons for flashing the VBIOS of a mobile GPU, for example if a newer version is available, or if you modify it for higher clocks or voltage, or maybe undervolt it for less heat… It’s a common procedure when trying to optimize your system according to your needs. However, flashing always involves a certain risk of rendering your card useless, “bricking” it, especially when experimenting with modded VBIOS versions. That’s also how I managed to brick my 6970m in my Alienware M15x. I tried to flash it with a modded version of a VBIOS which (apparently) wasn’t suited for my card. Sometimes it’s possible to do a so called “blind flash” to recover the card (flashing it without having any picture on the screen), however since my system didn’t even POST after flashing the experimental VBIOS I didn’t have this option. Fortunately a card isn’t dead after flashing a VBIOS which isn’t suited for it or after a bad flash, even if the system can’t boot anymore. The problem is only caused by the firmware of the card (VBIOS) and not by hardware faults. This means to get the card working again, it simply needs to be reprogrammed with the proper VBIOS. There are professional services which are capable of doing this for a little fee, but I decided to see whether I can fix the card myself. The VBIOS is stored somewhere on the card in a flash memory chip. It should be a serial flash memory chip with 8 pins. Here’s the location of this chip, for the Nvidia GTX 260m, AMD 6970m and ATI 5850m (from left to right) The memory chips are “single operating voltage serial flash memory” which use anSPI – bus. There’s no cheap programmer available which officially supports the chip which stores the VBIOS of the 6970m, but a couple of affordable programmers that can handle very similar chips (same SPI modes, memory organization, size, etc.). After comparing some datasheets of different flash memory chips and discussing it on the forum, I came to the conclusion that it should work with a cheap programmer, even though the specific IC wasn’t supported by it. Before and after desoldering the eeprom chip. (after image lost) Desoldering the chip is the most difficult part. You don’t want to accidentally remove one of those tiny SMD parts or kill something with too much heat. Also the card, and especially these little ICs, are ESD-sensitive, this means an ESD mat and wristband are highly recommendable for this job. I desoldered the flash chip with my hot air station, that’s much more comfortable than using a soldering iron (which of course is an option as well). Since most companies have to use lead-free solder, removing the chip needs more heat than for all the usual DIY soldering (which is mostly done with solder containing lead, at least in my case. It’s easier to handle in my opinion). As it’s a surface mounted device, it needs to be in a socket in order to be programmed, it can’t be put in the ZIF socket of the programmer. I don’t have an SOIC socket for this size, but the programmer came with an improvised PCB – socket for 8 pin SOIC chips. This means turning on the soldering iron and solder the chip to the “socket” (see the picture on the left side). Then I programmed the chip, it wasn’t recognized by the programmer, but choosing a chip from the list which was technically identical (same block size, interface, etc.) allowed me to erase the flash memory and write and verify the original VBIOS data. After doing the whole soldering procedure in reverse order I was finally able to boot the system again with the card. Tech|Inferno member AssimilatorX also suggests to reflash the VBIOS again per DOS and ATIflash, just to make sure that there’s definitely no error in the stored VBIOS. So operation “GPU reviving” was successful. This should work for most mobile GPUs I guess, since all cards I’ve seen so far use similar flash memory chips. Though it can still depend on the programmer. What’s needed is a steady hand, proper soldering equipment, ESD-protection and a programmer. Here’s a pic of my soldering workplace:
  2. It's really frustrating to me to have a new BIOS update, or a new model of laptop to flash, and for some reason or other, the flash goes badly and the system is bricked. The only recourse is to get it reprogrammed by sager, since it won't boot. I know there are chip programmers, but I know they have methods of flashing the BIOS, ME, and EC without removing the chips from the board. Are they using the Debug connector to do this? is it possible that I could get the specifications needed to recover the BIOS in the same way? What kind of Programmer interface would I need, and what would the pin-out be for the appropriate connector? Right now I am working with the P775TM1-G, P650HP6-G, p650HS-G and P955HR (physical variant of P950HR).
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.