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Found 39 results

  1. Hi! I registered for the specific topic. So, the big question for which I found no answer in internet. Windows 7 on Intel Core 8th generation. Officially, Intel supports windows 7 up to 6th generation. Unofficially, with an easy trick up to 7th generation. The question is, how can we make it work on 8th generation? I installed windows 7 Ultimate 64bit on my new DELL Inspiron 5770 high end non-gaming 17 inch laptop, without any issue apart from the integrated GPU (Intel UHD Graphics 620). This also blocks the functionality of the AMD Graphics card too. So, since for many reasons I want to have windows 7 instead of windows 10 or Linux, I did my best but I got stuck. I created a hybrid driver from 2 different versions of official Intel drivers, the latest, which supports this iGPU, but only on Windows 10 and the last windows 7 compatible, which does not include support for the specific 8th gen processor/graphics card, since it is newer. I mixed some files and also edited the inf file from the old driver. I will share with you what I did, so that someone who has knowledge might get 100% functionality. I get only partial. So, here is my guide. 1. Download the last Win7 compatible driver from Intel for HD Graphics. It is the version win64_15.45.19.4678 2. Download a newer version which is win10 only but contains the driver for your processor. In my case, Intel Core i7 8550U with DEV_5917. I downloaded the latest driver. 3. Make copies/backup of both folders and save elsewhere before starting editing. 4. Unzip both. From the unzipped ones, go to the new driver folder, then Graphics, then copy all components and paste in the Graphics folder of the old (15.45.19.4678) version. Note; So far in my case I didn't play a role if I replaced the same names of the old files with the new ones or skipped them to keep the old ones. Exception; do NOT replace the igdlh64.inf file and the igdumdim32.dll 5. Find the DEV number of the processor. Device Manager (from Control panel or search), right click on generic VGA Adapter, properties, details, ID. 6. Open the igdlh64 file (with a notepad) from the new version (Graphics folder) find the DEV number under windows 10 and copy the whole line. 7. Paste it under the Windows 7 section in the igdlh64 file of the old driver and correct the ikbl win10 with iskl win7 (known trick for 7th gen). 8. Copy all lines that include the 4-digit number from the igdlh64 file from the new driver and paste in the respective sections of the igdlh64 of old driver. In the end of the text, also add the name of the driver as a label, eg Intel UHD Graphics 620. 9. Install the modified old driver (win64_15.45.19.4678) and reboot. 10. After reboot. Copy the igdumdim32.dll file from the Graphics folder of the new version and paste it to the C:\Windows\SysWOW64 replace the existing files This way, I get all resolutions, full brightness, colour, contrast etc control of the display, intel graphics control panel, full windows 7 effects (aero glass etc), but I dont actually get video support (apart from 3rd party software, like VLC/GOM player which even play 4K video smoothly), 3d applications are not functional, I dont get hardware acceleration etc. I concluded that the solution is to edit the igdumdim32.dll file, so that I copy elements from the new version to the old one. This way, theoretically, it should work. Anyone who has experience with driver and dll modification???
  2. Hi! I registered for the specific topic. So, the big question for which I found no answer in internet. Windows 7 on Intel Core 8th generation. Officially, Intel supports windows 7 up to 6th generation. Unofficially, with an easy trick up to 7th generation. The question is, how can we make it work on 8th generation? I installed windows 7 Ultimate 64bit on my new DELL Inspiron 5770 high end non-gaming 17 inch laptop, without any issue apart from the integrated GPU (Intel UHD Graphics 620). This also blocks the functionality of the AMD Graphics card too. So, since for many reasons I want to have windows 7 instead of windows 10 or Linux, I did my best but I got stuck. I created a hybrid driver from 2 different versions of official Intel drivers, the latest, which supports this iGPU, but only on Windows 10 and the last windows 7 compatible, which does not include support for the specific 8th gen processor/graphics card, since it is newer. I mixed some files and also edited the inf file from the old driver. I will share with you what I did, so that someone who has knowledge might get 100% functionality. I get only partial. So, here is my guide. 1. Download the last Win7 compatible driver from Intel for HD Graphics. It is the version win64_15.45.19.4678 2. Download a newer version which is win10 only but contains the driver for your processor. In my case, Intel Core i7 8550U with DEV_5917. I downloaded the latest driver. 3. Make copies/backup of both folders and save elsewhere before starting editing. 4. Unzip both. From the unzipped ones, go to the new driver folder, then Graphics, then copy all components and paste in the Graphics folder of the old (15.45.19.4678) version. Note; So far in my case I didn't play a role if I replaced the same names of the old files with the new ones or skipped them to keep the old ones. Exception; do NOT replace the igdlh64.inf file and the igdumdim32.dll 5. Find the DEV number of the processor. Device Manager (from Control panel or search), right click on generic VGA Adapter, properties, details, ID. 6. Open the igdlh64 file (with a notepad) from the new version (Graphics folder) find the DEV number under windows 10 and copy the whole line. 7. Paste it under the Windows 7 section in the igdlh64 file of the old driver and correct the ikbl win10 with iskl win7 (known trick for 7th gen). 8. Copy all lines that include the 4-digit number from the igdlh64 file from the new driver and paste in the respective sections of the igdlh64 of old driver. In the end of the text, also add the name of the driver as a label, eg Intel UHD Graphics 620. 9. Install the modified old driver (win64_15.45.19.4678) and reboot. 10. After reboot. Copy the igdumdim32.dll file from the Graphics folder of the new version and paste it to the C:\Windows\SysWOW64 replace the existing files This way, I get all resolutions, full brightness, colour, contrast etc control of the display, intel graphics control panel, full windows 7 effects (aero glass etc), but I dont actually get video support (apart from 3rd party software, like VLC/GOM player which even play 4K video smoothly), 3d applications are not functional, I dont get hardware acceleration etc. I concluded that the solution is to edit the igdumdim32.dll file, so that I copy elements from the new version to the old one. This way, theoretically, it should work. Anyone who has experience with driver and dll modification???
  3. Hello guys, I've no idea where to post it, so this thread seems to be the most logical one, for me at least. However here is the link with the news about their upcomming GPUs suited for gaming: https://www.pcbuildersclub.com/2018/06/arctic-sound-intel-bestaetigt-dedizierte-gaming-grafikkarte-ab-2020/
  4. Hi everyone, I was looking into overclocking my 4800MQ, so I installed XTU. I'm more or less a beginner at this, however I noticed when I try to benchmark my CPU, the ''current limit throttling'' is almost always occurring. I've tried increasing the processor current limit and undervolting as well but it has no effect. Also, the package TDP doesn't seem to go above 39-40W... Could anyone help me with this? Why is my CPU throttling without reaching its limit?
  5. upgrading p151sm1

    i was wanting to upgrade my clevo p151sm1(not -a) that has a gtx 765m to a 970m or 965m and wondering if its possible to do before i go buying the gpu and have it not work (cpu is i5 4300m)
  6. P775DM3-G Problem with IRST

    Hi, I would like to ask you about Intel Rapid Storage Technology, since few weeks I have a problem with my RAID0 ( 2x 512GB SSD disks ) after I shut down Windows, and power on the laptop, I have a message that RAID is damaged and one of the disks is missing. So i figured out that I'll check it in BIOS settings, and in BIOS everything is OK, 2 DISKs are visible, RAID status is NORMAL, if I run Windows after BIOS, then everything works perfectly, but if I run windows in 1st place, there is always raid error, and one of the disks is missing. Have you met a similar problem, do you have any idea how to fix it? I have to admit that I had reinstall Windows, and it's not helping ( Windows 7 and 10 were tested ).
  7. I know, i know, i know... @svl7 said it's disabled, @octiceps said it's disabled and many other forum users said it's disabled. I am always want to double check everything and i did it this time too. And i would like to post here result of my research. But first thing first - my PC: Laptop Configuration: Lenovo Y500 SLI CPU: Intel i7-3630QM (2400-3400 MHz, Ivy Bridge, QuadCore) VGA: 2x 2048Mb NVIDIA GeForce GT650M (SLI Configuration) MB: Compal LA-8692P RAM: 2x 4Gb Ramaxel RMT3160ED58E9W1600 (11-11-11-28) HDD: 1TB Seagate Momentus 5400 (ST1000LM024 HN-M101MBB) SSD: 120 Gb Samsung 850 EVO (MGX S4LN062X01) Display: 15.6" LG\Philips LP156WF1-TLC1 (1920x1080) WIN: MS Windows 10 Pro (x64) Also i must say, that i have got UNLOCKED BIOS by @svl7. And for second VGA too. Research It's beginning from @geraldthread about his Ultrabay to PCI-E Adapter for Lenovo Y510p for useing Radeon Desktop VGAs as external VGA. It's performed well with Y510p, but there was zero info about how it perform on Y500 or will it perform at all (now we know that it's no, but it's another story). Unlocked BIOS didn't help with adapter and i decided to dig more deep in re-enabling integrated GPU in Intel CPU - Intel HD Graphics 4000. And new unlocked BIOS give me a lot of new options to play. But important thing is... some of them working, some of them no. So, here is what i am founded. First i go to new unlocked BIOS and saw there a lot new tabs. I go to Advanced => Video Configuration => Special Features This option already was Enabled (Switch Graphic Function) After that i go to Internal Graphic Device and Enable Internal Graphics Device. Then save changes and exit. Laptop is shutdown and after few seconds turn on again. I saw Lenovo loading screen and then nothing when loading complete. Windows didn't start. I am restarted laptop three times and it's started recovery mode. From recovery mode i am loaded Safe Mode and at that point i am finally was at Windows. My first way goes to Device Manager to see new device. And there was new device - Intel HD Graphics 4000. In safe mode windows can't access to it's current status, but there also was no error codes. First time there was no driver installed, but now it's even have last driver! After that i go to AIDA64 Engineer Edition and look what it's show me. It's saw iGPU! So, at this point i don't what to think about it. I can see iGPU in safe mode, but i can't boot with it in normal Windows. Is AIDA64 lie to me or even Device Manager? What do your think about it? P.S. Oh yeah, most menus on Russian language, but i hope your got the idea and trust me. =) It's no fake.
  8. So with AMD's 8 core Zen processor supposedly being released in January 2017, do you think it will keep up with Intel's latest offerings? And what is the max you'd be willing to pay for it? I've read indications it may be priced around $300 and be competitive with Intel Broadwell-E processors so if that is the case, it may be time for AMD to shine again.
  9. Ok, so this is my first gaming build. Theoretically, I am going to build a computer by the end of the year, and I have an 800$ budget. Yes, I know prices will change and new items will be release by then, but I am still in need of a base. So far this is what I have. CPU-110.99$ Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor MOBO-61.98$ MSI H110M Gaming Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard RAM-44.18$ Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory Storage-44.39$(SSD) 49.49$(HDD) Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive GPU-199.99$ EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB SC GAMING Video Card Case-66.99$ NZXT S340 (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case PSU-29.99$ Corsair Builder 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply OS-84.89$ Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit Monitor-109.99$ Asus VX228H 21.5" 60Hz Monitor Keyboard-34.99$ Cooler Master OCTANE Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse TC-5.88$ Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste
  10. 1st Build

    Hello, I am planning on building my first computer soon. 800 budget (can go over a little, includes os and monitor, max is 900) I will be using this computer mostly to game, right now I have parts worth 1000, so I would like to decrease that cost if possible without losing too much performance. The Build I have selected comes to just over 1,060$... Some parts may be incompatible, please let me know, and some might not be worth it. As you can see, I went with a red theme. (Would've went with blue but I already have red headphones and such.) CPU- (I would prefer to have a cpu that I can overclock, but with my budget it would be challenging.) https://pcpartpicker.com/product/xwhj4D/intel-cpu-bx80662i56500 Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor Cooler- If I don't have a cpu that can be overclocked, should I just go with the stock? https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hmtCmG/cooler-master-cpu-cooler-rr212e20pkr2 Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler MOBO- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/rLs8TW/msi-motherboard-h110mgaming MSI H110M Gaming Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard OR https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hMvZxr/gigabyte-motherboard-gah110ma Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard RAM- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/8hM323/kingston-memory-hx421c14fb8 Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory Storage-https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MwW9TW/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd10ezex Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive AND https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZdNp99/ocz-internal-hard-drive-arc10025sat3120g OCZ ARC 100 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive GPU- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/JVWrxr/msi-geforce-gtx-1060-6gb-gaming-x-video-card-geforce-gtx-1060-gaming-x-6g MSI GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB GAMING X Video Card Case- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/tD38TW/nzxt-case-cas340wbr1 NZXT S340 (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case PSU- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/zNK7YJ/evga-power-supply-100b10500kr EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply OS- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wtgPxr/microsoft-os-kw900140 Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit Case Fans- (Might not need, input?) https://pcpartpicker.com/product/XD9KHx/corsair-case-fan-co9050006ww Corsair Air Series SP120 Quiet Edition (2-Pack) 37.9 CFM 120mm Fans Monitor- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/WBw323/asus-monitor-vx228h Asus VX228H 21.5" 60Hz Monitor Keyboard- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/KWGj4D/cooler-master-keyboard-sgb3020kkmf1us Cooler Master OCTANE Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse TC- https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6RrG3C/arctic-silver-thermal-paste-as535g Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste
  11. I have an Asus laptop with hm76 Ivy Bridge chipset with Intel i7-3630qm, the CPU is 2.4Ghz and can Boost up to 3.4Ghz. What happens is the CPU throttles to x12 (1.2Ghz) when Turbo Boost is enabled, this at less than 70°C, the TCC activation temperature should be 95°C! The bios has the latest microcode patch v. 1C from Intel and before had the v. 15. I made a test with cinebench and monitored the behavior of the cpu with Intel Power Gadget, ThrottleStop and SpeedFan, I made a video. As you can see what happens is if I disable Turbo Boost with ThrottleStop the multiplier goes straight to x24 and the temperature goes up yet no PROCHOT signal is sent. If I disable BD BROCHOT the temperature goes up but never arrives to 95° .. it arrives to 80° / 81° C. So what is going on with this CPU?? I am now uploading the video to youtube and it will appear here And here another test: GeekBench with prochot disabled: and here enabled:
  12. Out of curiosity, could everyone share your Under Volt, Max OC and Package Power numbers? Run OCCT for the CPU stability test for at least 30 minutes. *** Please post stable clocks only and not under volts or OC's that will only last a few seconds before locking up. The Package Power will fluctuate a lot in patterns so please try to obtain a solid average to the best of your abilities or just state, "Low 90's, Mid 90's, or High 90's etc..." *** ----------------------------copy/paste-------------------------- Machine Specs: FROM: Hansung (BOSSMONSTER) [P775DM3] CPU: 6700K GPU: GTX 1080 CPU Thermal Paste: Grizzly Conductonaut + Delidded GPU Thermal Paste: Grizzly Conductonaut F1 Fan: ON Stock Clocks: (Max Stable Under Volt) CPU UV Core: -225mv CPU UV Cache: -225mv Package Power: High 60's CPU OC'ed to 4.6GHz: (Max Stable Under Volt) CPU UV Core: -55.7mv CPU UV Cache: -55.7mv Package Power: Mid 90's Max CPU OC: 4790.64, but still Testing... Voltage: Testing... --------------------------------------------------------------------- Feel free to add anything else to the list and screen shots would be great. 4.6GHz @ -55.7mv Stock Clocks @ -225mv
  13. Well guys...so now we know... What are your thoughts and first initial impressions? Do you foresee the new cooling design being able to cool the 1080 better than DTR's/Clevo's? Are you going to be ditching your current AW to get the new one? Will you be buying a different brand all together? Reason for the switch? Are you willing to pay DTR prices for the new AW if it turns out that way? (AW 1070 pricing is now available) Which screen option will you be opting for? FHD, QHD, or 4K? Do you care for Tobii? How long do you normally keep your laptop? -> Do you normally upgrade every year with the latest refresh? --> If so, is having LGA/MXM really practical for you? Things that I like: "...magnesium alloy for rigidity, copper for better performance and steel...." ".....overclockable DDR4 system memory capable of up to 2667 MHz overclockable DDR4 system memory capable of up to 2667 MHz....." ".... 17" QHD 120Hz display is designed to deliver the smoothest gaming experience with 4ms response time, wide viewing angles, 400 nits of brightness, and NVIDIA G-Sync technology...." "....a thinner design, better ventilation, higher quality sound and external ports organization...." ".... larger and more effective speaker box has been installed, improving audio output for a clearer and more dramatic gaming experience....." "....Avoid excess cables and embrace the “desktop mode” design, where most of your critical connections and ports are in the back and out of the way....." "....We offer the maximum amount of battery power legally allowed with the 99 Whr battery– storing and delivering the most amount of power found in any notebook battery for longer uninterrupted game play....." Don't forget the LED lighting that unlocks the BIOS and makes the AW hover for better ventilation. On another note, this is one step in the right direction...it can breathe I take it... What we know so far (stuff that we actually care about): * New AW17 1080 will be 180W and GDDR5X https://www.twitch.tv/alienware/v/87746534 (Thanks @DeeX for the heads up. Also confirmed from the horses mouth himself, Azor.) @ 4:46:26 …mentions 180W @ 4:49:33 ...worth watching it from here, lol... @ 4:50:10 ...takes a crack at Clevo...I love DTR's, but what he says is true. No heart behind Clevo's design, just a bunch of rebranded, rebrands. * Full on Copper heat sinks and heat pipes. * Back of display is metal. * Bottom of laptop is metal, anodized aluminum. * Laptop is very rigid. Watch them try bending it...it's solid as a rock. Lots of metal. * Keys on the keyboard are guaranteed and rated at 10 Million strokes. * Keys have a longer 2.2mm travel length. * N Key roll over technology. Able to register multiple keystrokes. * 19 Total Macro Keys. More added near the Num pad side on the 17". * The back plate of keyboard is steel enforced, all metal. * Bottom and Side air intakes. * Designed to keep the heat toward the rear and away from the front areas, keyboard / palm rest. ____________________________UPDATE (9/14/16)____________________________ Well guys: Click here Here are some early pricing (out) comparisons. I've been playing around with different configurations to get an idea of what we can expect for the overall pricing. I've noticed that it is a bit more ala carte in a way...well kinda... Note: It's possible that my numbers are off and if it is then I'll update it, but please do go price it yourself if you have a moment... Couple things I've noticed: * There is an option to get a display unit without Tobii. Thank goodness. I wonder if this is true for the up coming QHD panel? * The price for the 4K UHD w/ Frobii is outrageous. +$400?! Sheesh... Hope they offer 4K without Frobii. ____________________________UPDATE (9/23/16)____________________________ www.Alienware.com is now LIVE with pricing of the new machines, but only up to GTX 1070 configurations. --- Early Comparisons of an Alienware 17R4 (GTX 1070) vs Clevo P775DM3 (GTX1070): (Blue = Better / Red = Falls Short / Grey = Equal) ------------------------------------------- Clevo P775DM3 / Fager NP9172-S * i7-6700K * 1080 FHD w/ GSYNC * GTX 1070 * 16GB RAM DDR4 2400MHz * 256GB M.2 SSD * Killer 1535 * 2 Year Warranty …$2,114…NO TAX w/ GTX 1080: $2,502 Options: * 4K UHD w/ GSYNC is +$275 ________________________________ Alienware 17R4: * i7-6820HK * 1080 FHD w/o GSYNC * GTX 1070 * 16GB DDR4 2400MHz * 256GB M.2 SSD + 1TB Paper Weight * Killer 1525 * 2 Year Warranty $2,474 + PLUS TAX $198 (Avg. 8%) = ...$2,672... Options: * 4K UHD w/ Fobii Eye Tracking is +$400 ________________________________ Reality in terms of value to cost ratio: * 6700K (socketed lga) > 6820HK (mobile bga) * GTX 1080 for only $275 more on the DTR. How much more will GTX1080 be on the AW? * 1080FHD has GSYNC on DTR * Can paying $558 More for AW17R4 be justified? ________________________________ Current thoughts at this time and moment: Well to be honest, as for the pricing it doesn't look good if the numbers on the pricing page is anywhere near accurate. There's no way that I can justify paying ~$558 more at this point, however, that can change depending on the GTX 1080 and QHD variant. It's too early to tell. I'd like to also add that the 2 Year Warranty for Dell is "Blue," because it is far superior than Clevo's 2 Year Warranty. This is a fact (at least if you're in the US), so please let's not argue about this. As I've said before, "Do not pay DTR prices for a bga machine." This is just my opinion and everyone is entitled to their own, but please do the math and make a wise decision that best fits you and your needs. Notice that the comparison is between the AW17R4 vs the Clevo P775DM3, which is not the bulky DTR, but the more slimmer and (IMO) cleaner looking one. What are your thoughts?
  14. Y50 unlocked bios and Intel 8260NGW

    Has anyone successfully used the following WiFi card in a Y50 (modded bios with white-list removed)? Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 (8260NGW) NGFF wifi card 867Mbps 2.4/5GHz
  15. Intel starts sending Kaby Lake Processors to Laptop and Desktop Manufacturers Kaby Lake is the first Intel CPU to break the ‘tick-tock’ cycle, retired this year. Looking ahead, each manufacturing process of Intel will have three cycles to get the maximum performance of each process node in the future. The Intel Kaby Lake will be the third and final 14nm chip, then in 2017, Intel will make the jump to 10nm withCanonlake, then we will remain in lithography of 10nm until 2020 and you can expect a new range of processors every year. Is expected that new CPUs will have a TDP up to 95W and provide native support for several current technologies such as USB 3.1, HDCP 2.2 and Thunderbolt 3. This is an ‘optimization’ CPU, so it will be based on the technology introduced in Broadwell and Skylake, so hopefully new processors won’t a compared to Skylake CPUs launched huge performance leap last year. New CPUs will also be presented in the new Surface tablets in early 2017. Source First details of Intel’s 7th Generation Kaby Lake Core i7-7700K Regarding the specifications of Core i7-7700K, this flagship processor of the company (for that platform) is equipped with four cores with HyperThreading technology, it has a total of 8 logical cores at a base frequency of 3.60 GHz reaching the 4.20 GHz with TurboBoost frequency, far from the 4.00 GHz Base and 4.20 GHz Turbo-Boost of the current Core i7-6700K, although it could be changed as for now we are talking about an engineering sample. The information is supplemented with HD graphics with 24 Execution Unit , 256 KB cache Level 2 (L2) per core, 8MB distributed to the L3 cache, and its launch would take place at the end of the current year, so there is still enough time ahead. Source View full article
  16. Hi all, After I saw this result: http://hwbot.org/submission/2830783_0.0_cpu_frequency_core_i7_4700mq_4550_mhz , I got interested to replicate it with a similar method and decided to share my steps to score higher than a desktop 4.4ghz 4770k (according to cinebench ;)) Intel Stock microcode has a Turbo multiplier bin glitch that allows unlimited multiplier increase, I used prema's bios and removed a cpu microcode update to let the cpu run the stock glitched microcode. I will share the bios file, use it at your own responsibility and if you know what you are doing. 1) Download or dump your BIOS, if your bios is ami (my case) then use AFUWINx64 2) Get AMI Aptio UEFI MMTool v5.0.0.7 and UEFITool, HxD (or your fav hex editor) 3) Open your BIOS image with UEFITool, then File>Search, in our case Haswell has the following ID: , enter C3 06 03 in Hex pattern dialog click OK 4) You can see the last four Hex pattern result, double click the first result and a structure item in the main dialog will be highlighted, right click>Extract as-is to a folder (be sure to be neat and organized or you will mess things up) 5) Do the same with the third result and save it as a diff name other than the first one 6) Now in the folder you have saved the 2 files from step 4&5, open the first one with HxD(any hex editor) and look for be sure to choose Datatype:Hex-values then hit search 7) Press F3 to find again till you reach this pattern(highlighted): 8) (1) Indicates the microcode version, 17 in this case, we want 00 (cpu stock), (2) the platform ID (the search context we reached at) (3) the microcode length = 5000 (in my case) in reverse (important to know when the microcode ends in order to remove). 9) Adjust the cursor on the beginning of the highlight text/microcode (01) right click>Select Block>Length>5000 or whatever in your case 10) Delete the highlighted blocks (after step 9) then save the file 11) Do the same with the second result from step 3 to 10 then save 12) go back to UEFITool, double click the first result like you did in step 4, right click the highlighted structure in the main dialogue > Replace as-is then choose the FIRST file you edited in HxD 13) Double click the third result and follow step 12 with the SECOND file you edited in HxD 14) You will see "Rebuild" in action row, File>Save image as> P15SM04.PM2 in my case (can be any name as long as your flashing tool recognize it) 15) Open AMI Aptio MMTool > Load Image > your modified rom > CPU Patch Tab and verify there is no 06C3 in CPU ID 16) Be brave and flash your BIOS Windows Mod to remove auto update microcode on boot: Click on Start Type CMD in the Search box Right-click on CMD and choose Run as Administrator In the Command Prompt window and change to the directory where the file is located. To do this, use the CD command. You can follow the example below. to change to the Windows\System32 directory you would enter the following command and Press Enter cd \windows\system32 Now use the DEL command to delete the offending file. Type DEL mcupdate_GenuineIntel (and backup) Done! Overclocking: 1) Check CPU MCID:Download AIDA64 , open AIDA64>Motherboard>CPUID and look at IA Brand ID, it should be 00h 2) Download the latest beta Throttlestop (not stable) in my case 810b2 3) Make sure you don't have XTU installed or running (especially at startup) or it will reset any changes in Throttlestop 4) Open throttlestop, click FIVR and look at "[checkbox] Overclock [DIALOG] Max" and note it down 5) Now here is the magic! close FIVR and open it again, [DIALOG] Max value should increase by 2 (up to 80x max ~ 8ghz) everytime you open and close FIVR aslong as long as you increase one of the cores, LOL 6) Increase "Set multiplier" to maximum after your final changes in FVIR (Iv set mine to 42x all cores, so I increased set multiplier to 42 aswell - note voltage ID is messed up ignore it) 7) Increase voltage in FVIR for stability by using cinebench run 3 times instead of prime95, as it stresses FPU which increases heat and tdp instead... 8) Unlock maximum TDP and turbo wattage in TPL, in my case: 9) Done! Changes should be persistent as long as you dont save and exit from BIOS, here is my result in Cinebench with temp throttling (from 4.3 to 3.9 ghz), room temp 25-27 XD: (no.1 at 4.2ghz, no.7 stock latest microcode) UPDATE: OCed RAM from 1600 to 1866, cpu@4.3Ghz, +200mV adaptive vcore: I'm also getting 852 with 4.5ghz with this adaptive voltage-like method: Note: You can maintain maximum turbo multiplier bin with latest microcode after setting it in throttlestop (imp: no crash when testing; make sure its stable) then flash the latest microcode for bug fixes (more stable on my side at x45 with only +230mv, depends on your CPU, i7-4800+ will require less voltage), and you will still be able to set the bin high (up to 80x) as long as you don't crash... Post your results and I'll copy it here. Tips: I highly recommend lapping heatsink and use liquid metal thermal paste or any decent tp ( I used collaboratory liquid ultra) before doing this -If your cpu throttles no matter what, try decreasing dynamic voltage in FVIR and look at maximum value the package power indicate while stressing, decrease the value by 10% in order to avoid rapid throttling (happens with bad TP) -Do not attempt the OC if you are looking after long service life wear&tear (I expect 2 years from now if I stress the cpu everyday for an hour, which i never do :P) Happy overclocking, and don't melt your laptop Thanks to Intel if they leaked this on purpose, kinda futureproofed my machine XD P150SM 1.03.05 modded bios (at your own risk): MOD EDIT: link removed, please use a clean BIOS base because of legal implications with Intel :
  17. In a sad day for the tech world, one of the pioneers of the PC industry and ex-CEO of Intel, Andy Grove, has passed away at the age of 79. As noted by the article on Intel's website, Andy Grove was Intel's first hire in 1979 as company President after Gordon Moore and Andrew Noyce founded the company and then later was CEO in 1987. His legacy includes shifting Intel's focus from memory chips to computer processors helping transition Intel from a company that made $1.9 billion in revenue to $26 billion. Grove played a critical role in the decision to move Intel’s focus from memory chips to microprocessors and led the firm’s transformation into a widely recognized consumer brand. Under his leadership, Intel produced the chips, including the 386 and Pentium, that helped usher in the PC era. The company also increased annual revenues from $1.9 billion to more than $26 billion. Grove was both an astute engineer and a careful student of business management. His books High Output Management (1983) and Only the Paranoid Survive (1999) remain some of the most highly regarded management books. Grove was also active in philanthropy and helped donate towards Parkinson's research as well as donating $26 million to the City College of New York which helped establish the Grove School of Engineering. He was married to his wife Eva for 58 years and is survived by 2 daughters and 8 grandchildren. View full article
  18. In a sad day for the tech world, one of the pioneers of the PC industry and ex-CEO of Intel, Andy Grove, has passed away at the age of 79. As noted by the article on Intel's website, Andy Grove was Intel's first hire in 1979 as company President after Gordon Moore and Andrew Noyce founded the company and then later was CEO in 1987. His legacy includes shifting Intel's focus from memory chips to computer processors helping transition Intel from a company that made $1.9 billion in revenue to $26 billion. Grove played a critical role in the decision to move Intel’s focus from memory chips to microprocessors and led the firm’s transformation into a widely recognized consumer brand. Under his leadership, Intel produced the chips, including the 386 and Pentium, that helped usher in the PC era. The company also increased annual revenues from $1.9 billion to more than $26 billion. Grove was both an astute engineer and a careful student of business management. His books High Output Management (1983) and Only the Paranoid Survive (1999) remain some of the most highly regarded management books. Grove was also active in philanthropy and helped donate towards Parkinson's research as well as donating $26 million to the City College of New York which helped establish the Grove School of Engineering. He was married to his wife Eva for 58 years and is survived by 2 daughters and 8 grandchildren.
  19. Since I cant be sure since i dont have any references from the internet, but i think i finally hit the silicone jackpot! Since our i7-6700hq couldn't be overclocked anyways i thought i might as well undervolt it and lower the temps of it. And before i knew it BOOM! -200mV undervolt "Stable" (I'm still in the process of stress testing it). Like i said at the begining im not sure if its an amazing undervolt but i think its pretty good. Before undervolt it was around 82 degrees C on load now its a cool 60 degrees C. A 20 degree decrease! So current its running at around 0.835 V. Oh and the system I'm running is the Sager NP8657 (Clevo P650RE3)
  20. Hey Everyone, Well, I was FINALLY able to MOD a fully UNLOCKED A05 Bios for the m18x R1. I created several BIOS's that have the following Intel Raid OpRom v10.5, 11.2, 11.6, 12.9, 13.5. I'm told that 12.9.0 is the BEST version to use with our m18xR1. Also, these ROMS are modded to give TRIM on a RAID0 system! I've tested it and can confirm it does work! I also have an intel ME Firmware upgrade that you can do, as well, but I only sugest people that know what they are doing use it. Only because, for some reason, if you flash the ME firmware, then the Bios, there is a problem and you can brick your ME Firmware. (You'd need a new motherboard). It locks your firmware. Anyway, if you flash the bios that you want, and not even deal with upgrading the ME, then you're fine. But, if you do the ME firmware upgrade like I did, if you flash and bios's, you will need to downgrade the FW, before any BIOS flashing... (I THINK). In any case, you may just want to stick with the BIOS upgrade, as this will give you TRIM in RAID0 support (confirmed with trimtool). If interested, please let me know! Thanks, Swick
  21. We all love drama between technology companies and the latest deliciousness comes courtesy of AMD. They have a 4 minute video on YouTube that questions whether or not SYSmark is a reliable, objective benchmark to use when evaluating performance between different systems. AMD's video opens with John Hampton, Director Computer Client Products, talking about how it is very important in choosing the right benchmark when evaluating a purchase because if you choose the wrong one , you can end up overpaying for technology or getting a lesser performing PC. To emphasize his point, he indirectly mentions Volkswagen's diesel debacle and uses the latter case as an example of how even established organizations can be misleading. We are then introduced to Tony Salinas, an AMD Engineering Manager, who runs through a couple tests in SYSmark using two notebooks, one that has an Intel i5 CPU and the other with an AMD FX CPU. SYSmark returns a score of 987 for the Intel system and 659 for the AMD one which is a delta of 50%. AMD notes that this is misleading and not reflective of real life performance. To prove this, they run a different benchmark called PCMark 8 on both systems and the results show the Intel i5 system scoring 4199 and the AMD equipped one 3908 which is a delta of 7%. AMD says this is a far more realistic indicator of true performance as PCMark 8 tests the CPU, GPU and video subcomponents rather than emphasizing the CPU like SYSmark does. And just to drive the point home some more, AMD created their own in-house test using Microsoft Office Suite where they run a custom script on both notebooks and then measure the start and end of a task with a time stamp to gauge performance. Their in-house test shows the Intel system completing the task in approximately 61 seconds while the AMD based one finished it in roughly 64 seconds which is a delta of 6-7%. As AMD's results line up with those found with PCMark 8, they contend that PCMark 8 is a more fair and balanced indicator of overall performance while SYSmark is not and therefore should be discarded by any potential customers as a tool for evaluating a purchase. Intel system using AMD in-house test: Test completed in ~61 seconds. AMD system using AMD in-house test: Test completed in ~64 seconds. They also take the time to remind us that the FTC has required SYSmark published benchmarks to contain fine print that notes their benchmark may only be optimized for Intel. Of course, this may have something to do with the fact that AMD resigned from BAPco consortium. Finally, AMD notes that a transparent benchmark should meet very specific criteria which includes being realistic, unbiased, objective and transparent, all of which SYSmark is not apparently. While it's fun to see these types of videos from AMD, they also highlight the fact that the company is facing an uphill battle on all fronts, whether it's CPU or GPU, and 2016 may be the year that makes or breaks them. View full article
  22. We all love drama between technology companies and the latest deliciousness comes courtesy of AMD. They have a 4 minute video on YouTube that questions whether or not SYSmark is a reliable, objective benchmark to use when evaluating performance between different systems. AMD's video opens with John Hampton, Director Computer Client Products, talking about how it is very important in choosing the right benchmark when evaluating a purchase because if you choose the wrong one , you can end up overpaying for technology or getting a lesser performing PC. To emphasize his point, he indirectly mentions Volkswagen's diesel debacle and uses the latter case as an example of how even established organizations can be misleading. We are then introduced to Tony Salinas, an AMD Engineering Manager, who runs through a couple tests in SYSmark using two notebooks, one that has an Intel i5 CPU and the other with an AMD FX CPU. SYSmark returns a score of 987 for the Intel system and 659 for the AMD one which is a delta of 50%. AMD notes that this is misleading and not reflective of real life performance. To prove this, they run a different benchmark called PCMark 8 on both systems and the results show the Intel i5 system scoring 4199 and the AMD equipped one 3908 which is a delta of 7%. AMD says this is a far more realistic indicator of true performance as PCMark 8 tests the CPU, GPU and video subcomponents rather than emphasizing the CPU like SYSmark does. And just to drive the point home some more, AMD created their own in-house test using Microsoft Office Suite where they run a custom script on both notebooks and then measure the start and end of a task with a time stamp to gauge performance. Their in-house test shows the Intel system completing the task in approximately 61 seconds while the AMD based one finished it in roughly 64 seconds which is a delta of 6-7%. As AMD's results line up with those found with PCMark 8, they contend that PCMark 8 is a more fair and balanced indicator of overall performance while SYSmark is not and therefore should be discarded by any potential customers as a tool for evaluating a purchase. Intel system using AMD in-house test: Test completed in ~61 seconds. AMD system using AMD in-house test: Test completed in ~64 seconds. They also take the time to remind us that the FTC has required SYSmark published benchmarks to contain fine print that notes their benchmark may only be optimized for Intel. Of course, this may have something to do with the fact that AMD resigned from BAPco consortium. Finally, AMD notes that a transparent benchmark should meet very specific criteria which includes being realistic, unbiased, objective and transparent, all of which SYSmark is not apparently. While it's fun to see these types of videos from AMD, they also highlight the fact that the company is facing an uphill battle on all fronts, whether it's CPU or GPU, and 2016 may be the year that makes or breaks them.
  23. Intel's Gregory Bryant, vice president and general manager of Intel’s desktop clients platform, has gone on record during a speech at the J.P. Morgan forum saying that the company's IGP (integrated graphics processor) called Iris and Iris Pro are fast enough for casual and mainstream gamers and that they would no longer need a discrete graphics solution. That statement in itself does not sound unreasonable or outlandish as Intel IGP performance has steadily increased over the years and eaten into AMD and NVIDIA's low end share. However, Mr. Bryant also stated that Iris and Iris Pro can outperform 80% of discrete graphics chips , “We have improved graphics 30 times what they were five years ago,” but admits that Intel has done a poor job communicating the benefits of integrated graphics. According to Steam's hardware survey, as of December 2015, Intel currently holds 18.66% of the overall share with 54.61% going to NVIDIA and 26.23% to AMD. This market share is virtually unchanged from December 2014 where Intel had a share of 18.88% so it seems they do have some work to do if they want to increase their appeal to gamers. Unlike NVIDIA, AMD manufactures APUs that compete with Intel's IPG solutions but with the release of Iris 6200 pro, Intel has taken a significant lead over AMD and has even approached NVIDIA's discrete GeForce GTX 750 performance at the entry level. With AMD Zen APUs possibly being released in 2017, it may give the firm the opportunity to finally take back the low end APU performance from Intel. Source: PC World View full article
  24. Intel's Gregory Bryant, vice president and general manager of Intel’s desktop clients platform, has gone on record during a speech at the J.P. Morgan forum saying that the company's IGP (integrated graphics processor) called Iris and Iris Pro are fast enough for casual and mainstream gamers and that they would no longer need a discrete graphics solution. That statement in itself does not sound unreasonable or outlandish as Intel IGP performance has steadily increased over the years and eaten into AMD and NVIDIA's low end share. However, Mr. Bryant also stated that Iris and Iris Pro can outperform 80% of discrete graphics chips , “We have improved graphics 30 times what they were five years ago,” but admits that Intel has done a poor job communicating the benefits of integrated graphics. According to Steam's hardware survey, as of December 2015, Intel currently holds 18.66% of the overall share with 54.61% going to NVIDIA and 26.23% to AMD. This market share is virtually unchanged from December 2014 where Intel had a share of 18.88% so it seems they do have some work to do if they want to increase their appeal to gamers. Unlike NVIDIA, AMD manufactures APUs that compete with Intel's IPG solutions but with the release of Iris 6200 pro, Intel has taken a significant lead over AMD and has even approached NVIDIA's discrete GeForce GTX 750 performance at the entry level. With AMD Zen APUs possibly being released in 2017, it may give the firm the opportunity to finally take back the low end APU performance from Intel. Source: PC World
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