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Found 15 results

  1. Is it normal?

    I own a Clevo P151SM1 that I bought in a hurry last year after my Alienware died on me. It's done a good job of playing everything I've thrown at it but lately, it's been shutting itself off when I play certain games or graphics-heavy programs. When idle it sits around 38C which is great. But when I get into a game it skyrockets up to 97C as the last recorded temp before it shuts itself off. I've cleaned the fans and keep it on an elevated cooling pad (no fans on the pad cause I broke them) but it gets plenty of air. I know that 97C is probably damaging the card and I don't want that. Does it look like I'm going to have to repaste it? I've attached my latest readings if that would help. HWMonitor.rar
  2. First I want to thank the community, who have inspired me to do this project. I will give you guys the chance to follow me on this journey. I hope you will all help me come up with ideas, techniques and parts that could become handy. This modding may be possible to convert to allot of laptops. Let's begin! Here is the measurement of the went hole. 77mm X 16mm I have 2 ideas for what can be done.
  3. Since I switched over to a single card I have all this extra space and a heat sink and fan no longer in use. I was wondering if there would be a cheap alternative to buying the duel/6 pipe heat-sink - It is pretty expensive. Is there a way to mod/bridge the one two I have now . I attached a photo of what it looked like before I switched to a single card. Basically the right (slave) is empty. Of course I am not expecting a mod that would work as good as the 6-pipe heat sink built for my system. But it would be cool if I could use what I have and get my temps a little lower.
  4. Alienware M17X R4

    After messing with my Toshiba Qosmio this is where the fun starts for me. Hopefully someone else can also use some of this info for their own cooling mods. So i got this M17x R4 with a broken screen. I7 3610, 8 gigs ram, 7970M etc. Colors were all 70s psycho (LCD panel was cracked) Replaced almost the whole laptop with new parts, brand new 120hz screen, brand new 3920xm, almost new Gtx 880M Oem dell from an M18. New SSD drive among other things. The question presents itself, how to cool the thing down some more. I took out the Cpu heatsink, added another Pipe. Turns out the ones i had was too short and fluid filled. Had to use my biggest iron and solder it shut before using epoxy on it to be sure. Grinded off some rough edges and smoothed out the transition where the fins are. This Metal epoxy is doing an alright job transferring heat from the core pad to the fins aswell. I thought about buying the M17x R5 4 pipe cpu heatsink on ebay and modify it to fit. I wont dremel off the aluminum bracket (upper left in this image) to make the 4th pipe fit, because then the lower cover will be losing out on a clip. I hate loose panels so will look into cutting the 4th pipe on the 4 pipe cooler just before it reaches the chassis. As you can see in the picture i need to grind off a piece of the aluminum just over the inner bend to make the most out of the 4th pipe if i go that route later And so to the GPU, there is hardly enough room to fit a pipe over these three. I ordered 10 or so packets of heatsinks and coolers from some small gaming notebooks, i will get this next month. Im thinking a wide pipe that i bring to a friend of mine for flat machine pressing, or a cnc machined flat piece of aluminum over here. I dont think The ebay R5 - 5 pipe will work with the stock bottom as is. The GPU fan, i will buy a packet of small "P" gaskets and show you what i mean with forced cold air induction tomorrow. Im not an engineer, but why add the hole under the keyboard. Hot air goes up not down. On the Qosmio adding the gasket around the Fan and blocking the upper nonsense vent lowered the temps by quite a few degrees C And finally the gaps around the fins, there will be some of the same gasket here. No need to waste precious airflow from this (in my mechanical world) puny fan. In this image you can see the bracket covering the inner Pipe, so a straight flat pipe will do it or the machined piece im thinking about. Also around the edges of the fins around 5 pct of the airflow is returning back into the case. And what the heck were they thinking when they made the heatsink fins naked at the bottom leaking hot air everywhere. Even Toshiba knew they hat to cover it to keep air flowing the right way.. outside of the case. ------------------------- To be continued ------------------------
  5. [HARDWARE MOD] P157SM cooling overhaul

    Over the last month or so, I've been planning on overhauling my (slightly dated) P157SM to give it better cooling, and possibly higher performance. There were a number of sources I used for inspiration, and I'll attempt to document all of them later on, but first, pictures! This is the first modification I made. I increased the opening of the CPU fan to allow more air to go into the fan. As I recall, it helped with idle temperatures but I don't remember by how much. This picture shows how much I increased the opening by, I didn't do just that bit and stop Next up, I increased the width of the intakes directly over the GPU and CPU to reduce ambient heat buildup in those areas. I ultimately decided that increasing the width was not the best route to go (and it was quite ugly) so I decided to simply remove the vents I used some diamond mesh to cover those areas, but I don't have any pictures of that at the moment. Next I used some HVAC tape to direct the air flow from the CPU fan into the heatsink and not out the tiny gaps in the area. Then I swapped out the heatsinks (originally I ordered this from XoticPC and went with their copper cooling upgrade (I was young(er)) for some bigger ones. Everything is all nice and snug And finally with the lid back on. With the changes made between cutting the vents, and the last picture, I was able to drop load CPU temps ~5C which I thought was pretty nice. My goal is to also get rid of the vent over the fan, but I haven't found time to do it. I'm also planning on lapping the GPU heatsink, which will, again, take time. I'll post more updates as I make them (and post the benchmarks I've already done). Update: GPU Work: So I have a 780M at the moment (I'm planning on going to a 980M, though I may just wait for the Pascal GPU's to come out) and I decided to lap the heatsink, since I'm planning on overclocking it. Fresh of the block 400 Grit (10 minutes) 600 Grit (10 minutes) 800 Grit (10 minutes) 1000 grit (7 Minutes) 1200 Grit (7 Minutes) 1500 grit (about 25 minutes for this stage) And I thought it looked pretty smooth. One of my references mentioned cutting off the little tabs on the block, since they're mostly there for adding additional pressure (since the plate is usually warped) and I wanted to just lap the area directly over the GPU die (plus I don't really have a good place for grinding copper with my rotary tool). For the paste I used http://www.coolermaster.com/cooling/thermal-compound/mastergel-maker/ which I went with based on the favorable review posted at http://www.play3r.net/reviews/cooling/cooler-master-master-gel-maker-nano-thermal-paste-performance/ and the pads are Fujipoly high end (didn't think I'd need to go ultra). I also added some little sinks on to the heatpipes, though they might be suspect (more on that in the results below). And I sealed up a gap in the fan to direct more airflow through the larger fins. I also used from more HVAC tape to try to prevent ambient air from being drawn in to the fans, but this too might be suspect (it might be needed to draw it away, since where else is the heat from all those fins supposed to go?) And the results are... interesting... pre upgrade post upgrade So the initial benchmark had a 5C drop in temperature, but the following results aren't as promising. In fact, the stress test results appears to be higher (I'm speculating that it'd be over 86C by 400 seconds). I'm thinking that either the added heatsinks on the heatpipes are dispersing the heat before it can get to the fins, my lapping job wasn't so great, or I added too much TIM. I may try the washer trick from the p150 cooling threat mentioned below, but I'm spent on energy for this weekend. June 3rd update I finally got back around to working on my clevo some more and after a third re-pasting my temps are down (taking into account that today is hotter than when I first tested) I suspect that my older paste jobs were either too thick, or I bent the heatpipe and kinda threw the plate out of alignment. Inspiration: Modding my clevo in general: http://null-bin.blogspot.com/2015/04/extensive-clevo-p150sm-cooling-and.html Sealing up the gaps in the fins: Additional cooling ideas:
  6. Hello everone, i just want to share you some Hardware mod ideas for the p170hm. the goal was to improve the airflow for the fans, while maintaining a decent look of the notebook case. overall improvements: GPU (GTX680M OC) about 7°C drop at 100% load CPU (i7 2820QM) about 6° drop at 100% load not sure if the two small fans helping that much. you guys think its better if they would suck in the cold air instead of blowing hot air out? the fans are 30x30x7mm. the power is taken from the sata connector. this took me about 3 hours to make.
  7. All started when my brother's ASUS H61 motherboard died and I got his Celeron G540 (socket 1155). I also had an mITX case with a dead custom PSU that I don't intend to fix (Hantol HC ITX02). He now needs another PC in his bookshop, so, I decided to buy a cheap mITX 1155 socket motherboard that would use an External power brick. And I found a great deal on a Lenovo m91p motherboard @ 22$ plus shipping. Or so I thought. This motherboard uses non reference cooler holes making it impossible to fit the stock Intel cooler (or any other cooler that I had laying around and would fit the case). So I decided to use the old cooler from a Celeron D 330 (2.66GHz) a friend gave me after his motherboard died... It seems to have a big amount of aluminum in the middle and have aluminum fins... It just needed some trimming on the side cause there are some capacitors. I kind of hooked it on the motherboard using an 14" fan protector I got from a dead Thermaltake and some M3 screws and nuts. Add some MX2 the old stock Intel cooler on top of it and the results where ~ 26C @ idle and ~52C @ full load (using stress on Fedora 22). Pretty solid! I then decided to add an silent 92mm Scythe fan and the results where even better ~20-21C @ idle and ~ 45C @ full load... I lastly tried to use it passively, after an hour idle temperature was merely @ 66C and It took 30min of full load for the temperature to reach 100C. This means that I can probably run it with one or two case fans only. This will be tested. The results show that the old Celeron's D (73W rated TDP) had some pretty solid cooling solutions, that you may want to mod and use for cheap projects like this. I don't have an 1155 4C to test, but i am pretty sure that this cooler would outperform even the Copper Intel stock cooler shipped with these CPUs. More pictures with subs... http://imgur.com/a/DbOLW
  8. Hi, how can I control the fan speed of my GPU under OSX? At the moment my GTX 970 is always running on the same fan speed. Is this normal? How can I monitor my temperature under OS X? Under Windows the fan speed changes automatically. Thanks a lot for your help guys!
  9. Hey members! I bought my Lenovo y510p in the summer. I tought it is excellent but after some time i realized how bad this laptop is. I paid 1300euros for this thing and now I have many problems. First is overheating. I tried to change my thermal paste with (Arctic MX-2) It's not reduceing my temps at all. Only solution what reduced my temps were fan control. Second problem is that I can't play my favourite game NBA 2k15. I can't play it even on lowest settings. No matter what i do I can only get about 53fps. What do you guys think, what I should do? I have a headache because of this Lenovo machine. Any help is appreciated. cheers!
  10. Over at NBR in the "Pidge from nVidia" thread I posted up a screenshot of my HWiNFO64 during a sidetrack discussion of GTX 880M temperatures. D2 Ultima pointed out that my PCH was quite toasty: "Woah, the PCH was hitting 98 and averaging 95 there. Those things have an upper limit of 100c-105c, you should probably keep an eye on it or maybe try a cooling mod for it?" For those that are wondering... the PCH (Primary Controller Hub) is basically what used to a be known as a Southbridge. This all lead to further derailment of that thread to a short discussion of on PCH temps. My PCH has actually seen 108.5C as of the day before yesterday. That prompted me to tear down my laptop that evening. I started late and worked until 2am. Then I went to bed and finished up the next morning. Ok, enough prep. This is what I did. I had read that the P17xx series were a bit different than the P15x and P37x in terms of what it looks like under the keyboard. The other two models have free access to the PCH. Here is a link to n=1's PCH cooling mod for the P370SM. 5 mniute mod to improving PCH cooling in P370SM Well, it isn't quite so simple with the P17x series. As you can see, there is a big ol' chunk of plastic in the way. I can cut it, but I am not going near the assembled laptop with my dremel. A disassembly is in order to get to this thing. I am OK with that because I see it as a challenge and a chance to learn something (even if it's what not to do). Here is what I thought was an interesting picture. I have the top case all but separated from the bottom case. Getting the keyboard off is pretty easy. Just be careful of the two ribbon connectors. One is for the keyboard and one is for the backlight. The backlight ribbon is a pain in the butt to put back. All of the other ribbon cable connectors slide away from connector to release the ribbon. The backlight connector flips up. I didn't know that and I slide it away and the lock popped off. After some fiddling with it I dug through the service manual and the light went on. It's a tiny little bugger, but I got it back into place and everything still works. In this picture, the laptop is open and standing on the right side. The screen is on the far right and the bottom casing is on the far left. The top case is in the middle. Here you can barely see the PCH nestled under that nice, insulating plastic. No real hope of getting a breath of fresh air. In the second picture I have disassembled the laptop enough to get a better peek at the little hottie. My goal is to remove the top case so I can cut a hole in it and stack up thermal pads so they touch the bottom of the keyboard, which is a huge aluminum plate. This will make a nice heatsink for the PCH. This is the same thing that n=1 has done, only with less hassle than us P17x owners. Here the top case has been removed and you can now clearly see the PCH. I just eyeballed the location and marked it with a sharpie so I would have a guide before I head out to the garage for cutting. In a few minutes it's all done. I used a cutoff wheel at low speed. I cut straight down into the material from the top and then flipped it over and did the same thing from the bottom. Then I just pushed out the square cutout with my thumb. I am not too concerned about appearances with this mod as it won't normally be seen. After I was done cutting I used a wire brush at low speed to clean up the rough edges. I put the top case back on and find that my eyeballing wasn't too bad. Looks like I hit the mark pretty close. w00t! Now the only problem I have is I don't know how much stackup I need for my thermal pads. I used a 1/4 sheet of 1mm, 11.0 W/mK thermal pad from FrozenCPU.com which i cut with ordinary scissors. But, how tall to stack it? The answer is: modeling clay to the rescue. I just formed some modeling clay and stuck it on top of the PCH. Then I test fitted my keyboard, smushing the modeling clay. After that I removed the keyboard and measured the height of the smooshed modeling clay with my dial calipers. I measured .164" which is a bit more than 4mm. I cut and stacked 5 layers of 1mm thermal pad to make sure I had good contact. Then just put everything back together and played some games. The result was pretty good. The most I have seen is 85C on the PCH. The down side is the keyboard gets quite a bit warmer. I think the trade off is worth it. I was able to drop the max PCH temperature by 20c with this mod. BONUS: For those that are wondering, all three antennas are routed up to the screen bezel even if your configuration only uses two antennas. This is nice to know. If you think about it, it's a lot easier for Clevo to do this by default. The parts aren't expensive and it's one less thing to track if they all get it.
  11. Hi! So, I am new here, and I was hoping that I could get some advice regarding flashing the vBios of my GTX 680M, residing within my GT70 (Valkyrie CZ-17, from iBuyPower). As time have progressed, what was once a cutting edge graphics chip is now struggling to retain the flair it once held, and I with to restore it to its former glory, ie) squeeze every ounce of performance that I can out of this card. This being said, while I have a basic-intermediate knowledge of overclocking, I am entirely new to the concept of flashing a vBios, and thus I am a bit apprehensive as the last thing that I want to do is fuck up a $600 graphics card. I currently run a moderate overclock of 800 MHz, and 2000 MHz on the memory, using the stock vBios. My goal is to achieve a base clock of 900+ MHz, perhaps even 1000ish with a sudo-boost of sorts, if that is possible. I have an MSI GeForce GTX680M (4GB) Running - GeForce 335.23 WHQL - as a driver. The current BIOS is - 80.04.33.00.24 And the GPU is (obviously) a GK104, revision A2. I have been looking through the forums, and found what I thought to be a good BIOS, but it said that I didn't have access to the download, and all that I can find now is a vBIOS for a Clevo 4GB 680, and I have an MSI 4GB 680, so I worry of the consequences of using a such a combination of soft and hardware. ____________________________________________________________________________ Additionally, I have a question in regards to managing the thermals in this laptop. I currently have two external solutions, one moderately priced cooling pad with a 92mm fan, and a Jerry-rigged solution with a 10" desk fan that can successfully keep the laptop below 68C (stock clocks), with an ambient temp of ~20C. So, my question regarding cooling, are there any internal modifications that can be done to increase the potency of the internal fan, if the internal fan can be upgraded for a more effective model, or if there are any software tricks to turn the fan up to 11, metaphorically speaking. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated. -Emma (Seriously, I would really appreciate some advice here)
  12. Hey everyone! I have the MSI GT60 with the i7-3610QM and GTX 680m, this being my first gaming laptop. I have been very satisfied with my purchase, though one issue has always been bothering me over the past year and that is the cooling of this laptop. The temperatures of my CPU has been well within acceptable range, but during longer periods of play (for example Alan Wake, Batman AC etc..) the temps got as high as 92 degrees (with stock clocks). After some modifications such as repasting, backplate mod and a cooler the GPU temps are back within normal range. To any fellow MSI owners, what are your stock temps, overclocked temps and if you did any cooling mods to achieve a higher overclock while maintaining a reasonable temperature range. I'm not sure if my experience mirrors that of other MSI laptop owners, but what is your cooling efficiency? Looking forward to hearing from you guys and as corny as this sounds... Keep it cool
  13. CPU Fan Upgrade Procedure for M17x R3/R4 (2.0CFM->10.4CFM!)<o:p></o:p> My original CPU fan was adequate (not great but adequate) fora 3740qm CPU @ 3.7GHz but when I upgraded to a 3920xm CPU and overclocked to4.1GHz x 4 cores, I needed more cooling - a lot more. Running a 60-second CPU stress test on all four cores in Intel XTU, with a 65watt CPU TDP programmed, and a core voltage of 1.351v, the difference is asfollows: · With original fan, system runs @ 4.1GHz for ~28 seconds before dropping to3.5-3.7GHz because of heat. On longerstress tests, it DOES NOT recover from this reduced speed state becausecooling is not adequate. Core Max: 92-95Celsius. · With this fan mod, system runs @ 4.1GHz for ~55 seconds before dropping to 3.7GHzbecause of heat. On longer stress tests,it DOES recover from this reducedspeed state and spikes of ~4GHz are seen for the remaining duration of thetest. Core Max: 92 Celsius every time. <o:p> </o:p> So here are the stepswith some pictures: 1. Procure an M14x R2 fan. It MUST be an R2 fan!! The fan blade design is clearly different so usemy picture as a reference. There are many eBay sellers, for example, selling the R1 fan as an "M14x series fan," implying that bothrevisions use the same fan - which is not true. The R1's fan has a 2CFM sticker rating while the R2's has 10.4! The markings to search for are: XN0G5 and/or DC28000AJF0. I got mine here: http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Cooling-Fan-for-Dell-Alienware-M14x-XN0G5/207462_647373968.html Note: Do not just swap the M14x's fan blade into your existing M17x fanshroud. I tried that first and it doesnot increase airflow. You need the newblade AND the new shroud for this to be effective. 2. Remove your original CPU fan. There are three screws that hold it in. Also disconnect its power jack from themotherboard. While you have access, youmight want to blast that exposed exhaust port with some compressed air to makesure everything is clean. 3. Notice the three mounting brackets that protrudefrom the sides of the fan shroud in the picture from Step 1. You'll need to cut them off so the shroudwill fit. I used a Dremel with agrinding wheel. There's also one smallblack screw in the corner with the yellow sticker. You'll need to remove it and grind down thatprotrusion as well. Save that screw forlater btw. 4. Make spacers/pads to hold the new fan up. The factory pieces will not line up so you'llwant something under the fan for clearance and to allow air intake from theunderside. I used small pieces of arubber material called Dynamat but padded mirror tape would work, as would manylayers of electrical tape placed on top of each other. It doesn't matter what you use - as long asit won't melt - and you'll want it to have a small footprint so it doesn'tblock airflow. I made my pads abouttwice the height of the factory material. Higher pads will allow for greater clearance and more air intake - justbe sure the fan still lines up with the heatsink and the case closes over it. This picture shows the three pads I made, and the fan shroud with its originalmounts ground off. 5. Create a mounting bracket to secure the fanshroud at the point farthest from the exhaust port. You could optionally fabricate mounts to lineup to all three screw threads on the case, but with my sturdy rubber pads andthe tape that will be included on the exhaust side if you buy your fan new, Iwas fine with only one new mount. Note: Leavethat tape covered until the end of Step 7. I used a thin piece of copper but any metal is fine. Bend the metal so it lines up to both the topof the fan shroud and the point above the screw thread on the case. Mark how it sits on the fan shroud and drill twotiny holes (1/16" bit) through the shroud-side of the mount. Now place the mount on the shroud using yourmarkings and VERY CAREFULLY drill further so that you have holes going throughthe plastic as well. Do not push hardand do not hit the fan blade within! Drill a slightly larger hole on the case-side of your mount where itwill line up with the screw thread. Thescrew you saved from Step #3 can be used for one of the shroud-side holes andwill not hit the fan blade within. Ifyou can come up with another similar screw, use it for the second hole. If not, you can take one of the other twofrom the shroud assembly if you want. It's also held together with clips so it won't fall apart. One of the three screws that held in youroriginal fan shroud can be used for the other (case side) of the mount. 6. Thoroughly blow off your new shroud inside andout with compressed air to remove any stray plastic scraps from the machiningprocess. 7. Fit everything up, making sure the fan sitsflush on all the pads you've made. Makesure it lines up with the heatsink and isn't too high or too low into thecase. Adjust pads as necessary. Once you're satisfied, screw in your mount tohold the fan in place. Now lift up thetape on the exhaust side (which should still be covered) and remove thecovering. Carefully fold the sticky partdown onto the copper heatsink pipes to secure that side of the assembly. 8. Plug in the fan's power jack. Again, ignore the connector being a differentcolor. It fits and it works withoutmodification or programming. 9. Close your unit up and enjoy!! So there it is! Let me know how this works out for you guys if you try it - and what you think about the procedure itself. Suggestions/questions are always welcome! * I obviously assume no liability if you break anything doing this. Informational purposes only, etc, etc, * This procedure replaces the M17x's original CPU fan (and fanshroud) with that of the M14x R2, and yields a greatly increased fanoutput. Both fans use the samemotherboard connector (ignore the color difference of the jack) so all that'sneeded here is to procure an M14x R2 fan, modify the mounting system a bit soit fits, and connect it up - and it works like a charm!
  14. Hello guys, I've been reading here a lot and trying to find a solution to my problem with nothing yet. My M14x specs are: Intel® Core™ i7 2670QM 2.2GHz (3.1GHz w/Turbo Boost, 6MB Cache) 1.5GB DDR3 NVIDIA® GeForce® GT 555M 8GB DDR3 at 1600MHz Kingston HyperX 240GB SSD Kingston (6GB/s) As I have noticed many other people here have cooling problems with there M14X but in my case the computer and the temperature were fine for months and then started to slow down and slow down over time 9 months from when I bought it this computer is useless sometimes Here is the problem: When I start the computer everything is great temps are in the low 60s for GPU and low 70s for CPU I lunch World of Warcraft I get around 120 to 90 FPS on high or 70 on ultra after around 20 minutes of play time it keeps slowing until I end up with around 14-8 FPS and GPU temp is at 98 while CPU temp is at 99 on all 4 cores some times it goes higher on both ends that the keyboard heats up, the SSD is stable at 41 but if I keep playing while cores at 99 it starts heating up to 50s, some times restarting the game helps a little mostly not however if I wait for 10 minutes and play again the game will work again. my fan seems to be working so I don't know what to do I tried to check fan speeds and meh that was a failure my computer is not very usable now for its only purpose and I'm not sure what to do next I did all sorts of updates and changes I'm also considering calling dell or maybe changing the thermal paste my self, was also considering trying to design a water cooling system for it in like a station when I'm not travelling with it as I do with my desktop but I think then I'm better of selling it this problem has been taking a lot of my time and causing me a lot of stress. Any help would be greatly appreciated
  15. Documentation Take a look at those heatpipes! *phew!* 3 thick heapipes per GPU. This thing can easily take a couple of 485m's. The questions remain: Power Circuitry? is it going to be enough? (probably) Bios whitelisting? Will the bios block non-approved cards? (also, probably) I am moving in August, and my job contract ends in July, so I will be buying my m18x in sept-oct this year. If by then they still dont have the 485m sli as a selection, my plan is to: Buy the base config with 460m sli from USA Buy the 485m sli pair from logicalblueone (local supplier) and MAKE IT WORK ??? Profit! Im sure someone will want to buy an SLI pair of 460m's somewhere on ebay if I can get it to work, but overall, I'm excited and hopeful! I was in doubt about the 485m's until I saw the cooling. It looks monstrous! As soon as I know everything is all working, I am going to proceed to see if I can do any cooling improvements to this behemoth. It will be interesting to see if they learned from all our work on the M17x-R2. -Ash
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