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John Entwistle

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About John Entwistle

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    Curious Beginner

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    USA
  1. John Entwistle

    12.5" HP Elitebook 2570P Owner's Lounge

    I might add, that particularly when swapping or modding Intel CPUs, that it’s important to read Intel’s own definition of TDP: “Thermal Design Power (TDP) represents the average power, in watts, the processor dissipates when operating at Base Frequency with all cores active under an Intel-defined, high-complexity workload. Refer to Datasheet for thermal solution requirements.”
  2. John Entwistle

    12.5" HP Elitebook 2570P Owner's Lounge

    I actually had it Underclocked at 30x Turbo-boost when I ran that Benchmark because when I repeated the Stress Test, that took care of the Thermal Throttling for now. Taking that limitation off, I got 626 Marks. I *think* I’ve seen higher than that before, but I don’t remember for sure to be honest. I now have my 2570 loaded with Microsoft Office Pro Plus and Visio, ($15 each through my company), one of Microsoft’s Screen Savers, and I’m trying out Cyberlink’s Media Suite. I’m not sure if they slow down the test results, but Man, does Cyberlink ever take over your PC with all kinds of Desktop Icons and other Shortcuts, including additions to File Manager. I really don’t like that kind of thing, and I’m glad I Imaged my laptop before I installed it. Who trusts Uninstalls? My Screen Saver did change my picture while running the test. Juandante, I’m an honest person, and I would NEVER post dishonest results, especially on a forum where what I share might influence what someone spends their money on. I have no cause. I bought a 2570 because I had a 2560 in my old job and loved it. I did a lot of shopping around other brands and newer laptops, and I just couldn’t find anything I liked better, small, with an Internal Optical Drive. I found a i7-3940xm on the cheap, and after reading what Intel says about undervolting, decided to take my chances. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend someone else follow my example. Maybe I got an exceptionally good CPU, and/or maybe there’s some luck involved. It is a New CPU, if that matters. But I would think that running it for a solid 2 months, (probably close to 3), 24 hours a day, compressing my movie collection with the very CPU-intensive HandBrake is a pretty good test. I actually ran it without an External Vacuum Fan about 1/2 that time, without limitation, so I must have been Thermal Throttling most of that time. It seems that the safer route would be like mikmaze, (and others), took with his 3840QM. Oh, but I did state one thing inaccurately. You can install Intel’s Extreme Tuning Utility with other CPU utilities, it’s just not advised. You could wind up with modifications all over the place if you’re not careful.
  3. John Entwistle

    12.5" HP Elitebook 2570P Owner's Lounge

    I put an Intel 3940xm in mine and it works great. Being an Intel Extreme processor, it is tunable using Intel’s Extreme Tuning Utility, (ETU), a free download. IETU confirms that the 3940xm is under-volted at boot. But the utility’s built in stability test proves that it’s stable. It did hit 103-104 degrees Celsius a few times during this intense testing, but it thermal-throttled itself 3-4 times in 5 minutes, and was still stable. I bought a laptop cooling pad with stereo speakers built in for better sound, and an external vacuum fan. This combo kept the CPU temps down around 85 degrees Celsius during the test. I like 80 degrees better, so I limited the Turbo-Boost to 3.2GHz. I replaced the DVD drive with a Blu-Ray and used my new laptop to digitize my entire collection of DVD and Blu-Ray movies, running it constantly for about 2-months, using MakeMKV and the extremely CPU-intensive Handbrake. During normal computing, not gaming, the CPU runs between 40-60 degrees Celsius with just the built-in heat sink and fan. Hope this helps someone. Update: I was also able to get a Samsung 860 PRO 4TB 2.5 Inch SATA III Internal SSD (MZ-76P4T0BW) [$950 on Cyber Monday] to work. I had trouble getting the original 256GB SSD with Windows 10 and a 500MB System Patition 1, ~200GB C: Partition 2, 850MB Recovery Partiton 3 to expand Partition 2 past 2TB with CloneZilla even though I set the BIOS to UEFI hybrid, converted it to GPT disk, and MBR2GPT in Windows PE. I was finally able to use Parted Magic to move Recovery Partition 3 to the end, past the unused portion, then expand Partition 2 C: to ~3.8TB. Also put in a Intel 7260 802.11AC. Now I have the compact, fast (i7-3940xm runs about like a modern i7-7700HQ), portable video machine with built-in Blu-Ray drive that I wanted. Really didn’t want external BR. Extra USB3.0, 1394b, and HDMI ExpressCards complete the package. I may look at cooling mods and will keep watching the BIOS hacks with great interest as that’s where my expertise ends. Thanks guys. Hope this helps someone. Happy modding.
  4. John Entwistle

    12.5" HP Elitebook 2570P Owner's Lounge

    You can't load ThrottleStop or any other utility like it when you have Intel Extreme Tuning Utility installed, and there's really no reason to when they pretty much do the same thing. Just for you, I ran a 5-minute stress test with only my cooling pad fan on, no external vacuum filter or fan. I'm attaching it and the benchmark test.
  5. John Entwistle

    12.5" HP Elitebook 2570P Owner's Lounge

    I put an Intel 3940xm in mine and it works great. Being an Intel Extreme processor, it is tunable using Intel’s Extrem Tuning Utility, (ETU), a free download. IETU confirms that the 3940xm is under-volted at boot. But the utility’s built in stability test proves that it’s stable. It did hit 103-104 degrees Celsius a few times during this intense testing, but it thermal-throttled itself 3-4 times in 5 minutes, and was still stable. I bought a laptop cooling pad with stereo speakers built in for better sound, and an external vacuum fan. This combo kept the CPU temps down around 85 degrees Celsius during the test. I like 80 degrees better, so I limited the Turbo-Boost to 3.2GHz. I replaced the DVD drive with a Blu-Ray and used my new laptop to digitize my entire collection of DVD and Blu-Ray movies, running it constantly for about 2-months, using MakeMKV and the extremely CPU-intensive Handbrake. During normal computing, not gaming, the CPU runs between 40-60 degrees Celsius with just the built-in heat sink and fan. Hope this helps someone.
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