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duracell071

[HARDWARE MOD] cooling mod that took about 6 degrees off my gpu temps

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That's pretty sweet! Did you see an increase in overclock as a result? Also can you add some more detail of what this mod involves in your first post? 

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haven't tried yet, my main problem is that my card gets unstable above +50v increase, so right now i just want to get temps down, even tho 85degress is safe i really want to be under 80 like i am at stock if i can. Mod was easy, cut some grooves into the bottom plate to either such air out or blow air into (blowing worked better) and then i took apart the cooler and for now attached it with blue tac.  Obviously if you have right tools and are more patient you can do much better job than me :) here's some pics -

 

 

 

 

 

 

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so it seems i can push my voltage higher with this, which leads me to wonder what it is that's overheating when i push up voltage because core temps were always under 85 degress but system would still fail if i upped voltage by more than .50mv. If someone can tell me what it might be i can check placement of my pads, it's not memory for sure.

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What's possibly limiting your overclock is your VRM which can run quite hot. @johnksssand @Mr. Fox could probably shed a lot more light on the subject since it's been a few years that I messed with mobile overclocking. 

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ok, would be great if someone can point out which part is vrm, can get some better thermal pads their then. I only have good thermal pads on the memory right now which made a huge difference already

 

thanks dude

 

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Guest

The MOSFETs, inductors and phases can get super hot and there is not a great way to prevent this when overclocking. Short of building more effective heat sinks, there is a limited amount you can do. If you have room inside of the chassis, you can try attaching copper blocks like the square RAM heat sinks to provide an additional path to wick away heat. What can happen is that such a mod starts off cooler, but ends up saturated with more hot metal and no good way to expel the heat without added air flow. The most effective mod would be additional heat pipes and larger heat sink radiators. I have attached a photo showing the parts that seem to get the hottest besides the core. The MOSFETS are in the blue boxes. These can get much hotter than the sensor for the GPU suggests, and these parts have no temperature sensors to alert us to the fact they are getting too hot. If you are seeing 85°C core temps, chances are great these other parts that have no sensor are getting insanely hot and causing your thermal instability.

 

I am attaching a photo showing the copper RAM heat sinks mentioned above. They come with thermal adhesive tape. Move them around and find out if there is a spot where they help the most. Once you figure that out, and confirm adding them doesn't make the temps worse due to heat saturation, you can remove the thermal tape and use Arctic Silver thermal epoxy to attach them permanently. If you can keep the temps in the 70's for gaming with stock clocks and voltage that will be adequate.  

 

What I, @johnksss and @usmc362 do to manage the temps when doing extreme overclocked benching is use a portable AC unit. Obviously, trying to use a portable AC unit for normal everyday stuff isn't reasonable and it could cause some problems with condensation.

 

If your heat sinks have a snug fit between the copper heat plate and GPU die using Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra or Phobya Liquid Metal thermal paste can make a huge difference. If they are a sloppy fit, then you need to use something like IC Diamond to plug the gap because the liquid metal thermal interface material doesn't work well at all with a sloppy fitting heat sink. 

 

I have to ask out of curiosity, why was it necessary to disassemble the housing on the booster fan? I am sure you had a good reason for doing that, but you did not explain why it was necessary to do that. It might be helpful information for others.

 

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Edited by Guest

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because it was useless as it was, great for a laptop with a weak fan but my clevo's fans are more powerful, and it just made laptop hotter. What i realised is that these fans expel a hell of a lot of air but have really crappy suction. The innitial plan see when i made the additional vents was to suck air out so i could install heatsinks and not have the air stagnate in the case, but these fans just don't do much.  So when i turned them around i noticed temps dropped fast and stayed dropped but i was losing a lot of air because it just doesn't line and it's too big and clumbsy. That's when i decided to take them apart, and now they are much smaller and fit between the gpu and gpu vents nicely. I think the key to this working is that i made extra vents where the underside of the laptop slants up, so the cold air blows over the gpu and heatsink and out the underside though the front. You can feel the air blowing through ever so slightly though the front (underneath). That's why i'm really hopeful that the mini heatsinks could work well with this, because the fan is forcing air into, and then out of the laptop.

 

come payday i'll experiment and get back to you guys anyway. Right now i run  stable at +75mv and temps are between 78-80

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p.s. my heatsink is flat, i lapped it very well, but, my gpu core plate is really far from from, i was pretty surprised by how much, but i've did a bit of a cowboy job to brace the copper heat plate as firmly as possible to get the best possible contact with ic diamond, and if not perfect  it's still much better than before the lapping. 

 

I have been wondering if getting a heatsink from eurocom would be better? they seem mildly beefier, my stock one was not even sitting straight, it bent upwards giving poor contact with memory chips which i had to spend some time fixing.

 

One last thing, do you think 1.5mm  11/mk fujipoly pads stacked on top of eachother for the MOSFETS would be an improvement over the stocks pads? they definitely were for the memory chips (but they were not stacked). I have to stack as i can't find thicker ones in uk

Edited by duracell071
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1 hour ago, duracell071 said:

p.s. my heatsink is flat, i lapped it very well, but, my gpu core plate is really far from from, i was pretty surprised by how much, but i've did a bit of a cowboy job to brace the copper heat plate as firmly as possible to get the best possible contact with ic diamond, and if not perfect  it's still much better than before the lapping. 

 

I have been wondering if getting a heatsink from eurocom would be better? they seem mildly beefier, my stock one was not even sitting straight, it bent upwards giving poor contact with memory chips which i had to spend some time fixing.

 

One last thing, do you think 1.5mm  11/mk fujipoly pads stacked on top of eachother for the MOSFETS would be an improvement over the stocks pads? they definitely were for the memory chips (but they were not stacked). I have to stack as i can't find thicker ones in uk

 

Yes, the stock pads aren't very good. I replaced my FET pads with 1.5mm, and 1mm everywhere else. I also sanded down the heatsink posts some so the memory/inductor/FET heatsink portion sits slightly lower.

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i'll be sure to replace them then ;) when you sanded posts, you used an electric sander? i think it would be quite a tank by hand no?

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You only want to take around a half millimeter off. Taking off more would remove the flathead groove. I placed the sandpaper on a table and just ran the posts over it, holding the posts in my hand.

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