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Overclocking on a Laptop - Do or Don't?

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I'm currently running an Intel I7 4700 2.4GHz in my Lenovo Y410P. I would like to get a bit more speed out this chip, but I am unsure that it would be wise to overclock a processor on a laptop due to heat concerns. I have never overclocked a processor, but am not opposed to trying it. Of course by trying it I mean extensively reading every related topic to make sure I don't royally screw something beyond repair.

More consicely stated, would you (assuming you have experience with overclocking) recommend overclocking in my particular situation? The most intense program I utilize is Solidworks, which will consistently peg out my CPU when rebuilding assemblies.

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Do you want to overclock over your bios or with a software tool? If you do it i would overclock slowly, like from 2.4ghz to 2.5ghz and then test it a day if it works, if you get random reboots like bluescreens or some stuff like this i would undo it

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The model that you have will need a serious repaste job and maybe a little mod to tighten the heatsink screws better in place from what i know . After that you should be good to do it as the cooling is quite decent after the small mod and repaste . If you are not willing to do those things then i would advise against oc'ing it.

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2418

The main issue you run into with any overclocking job is the tendency to overheat. In a desktop, this can easily be overcome through several methods: massive heatsinks and fans, liquid cooling, dry ice, I've even seen a gaming room built inside a walk-in freezer. When you overclock on a laptop, your options become much more limited. Sure, with heavy mods you can add a liquid cooling system or some outrageous heatsink, but more than likely it will lose it's portability (at least to an extent). If you do OC, I'd go with Cotofana's suggestion and definitely repaste first, but I'd advise against OCing too much. Start out with baby steps, bumping up by small increments and keep a close eye on your temps.

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i can OC my i7 3720qm in my alienware bios...the extreme edition is off by default, after enabling i have 3 tiers to choose from......i can OC this cpu to 3.999 so 4 really.....it will get warm, under load of a game, maybe mid 80c's not that bad though for 4 ghz

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Though I'd answer your question with a blanket "yes", it really depends on what your current temperatures are like under the real-world loads you're encountering. Reprocessing assets on your 3D package of choice is far more processor-demanding than gaming. If you're all-ready hitting temperatures in the 90s, see about repasting your chip. if that doesn't create much/enough headroom for the temperature increase from overclocking... you at least have a tentative answer without having gone too far down the rabbit hole.

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it can be done, just watch your thermals, also that isnt an extreme edition CPU so it wont be going to far in the way of an OC. so its unlikely you'll run into a heat proble, if you arent now. especially if you do a repaste, i recommend noctua nt-h1. its very noob friendly. wont fry stuff if you get it somewhere in shouldnt (like liquid ultra or pro will) 

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As long as temps are fine, overclock it. I see no reason not to. If that is a “locked” cpu you’ll have to modify the bios to overclock it.

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