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Playstation 4/Xbox One versus dedicated Blu Ray Player

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I would like to get a Blu Ray player eventually and I'm wondering how the PS4 and Xbox One compare as a Blu Ray player to a similarly priced dedicated Blu Ray Player. I understand that you're paying for more than just a Blu Ray player when you get a PS4 or Xbox One but how do the game consoles compare to a similarly priced Blu Ray Player? I would bet that a Blu Ray player that costs more than a PS4 or Xbox One plays Blu Ray much better but how would a Blu Ray player that costs $300-$450 compare against the game console that plays Blu Ray discs? Thank you.

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Posted (edited)

We have PS4  and Xbox and those works fine for us. I'm not so familiar with Blue Ray player. However, I  heard that a particular brand has a lot of features that is even cheaper.

Edited by Cailley06

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