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thegh0sts

P870DM-G 980DT Heatsink Mod for MSI 1070

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Looks like the heatsinks from Amazon arrived before the heatsinks from moddiy.com and Amazon shipped later. Will probably do a test install with all the parts now.

Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk

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Make sure you do before and after benches. I'm interested to see how reducing the temp allows it to clock higher and the impact on scores.

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Running the usual tests and being that today is a warm day here in Sydney, Australia, the temps were about the same and stayed below 70 celsius.

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Here's what the heatsink looks like installed. The mini-heatsinks don't seem to stay on and while I am tempted to glue the heatsinks in place though the resale value will go down.

Oh well.

6e7aff5d8aaadbfacff81dc47dc33c2c.jpg

Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk

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Ended up using thermal adhesive to attach the mini heatsinks to the gpu.

Bye bye resale value!

Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk

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the thermal adhesive seems to be working well at holding down the heatsinks. the thermal tape just didn't have enough stickiness to stay on and a heatsink would get loose when i would reopen the laptop to see just how effective the adhesion was and, as said, it wasn't great. So I used Arctic Silver Alumina thermal adhesive to attach the heatsinks to the exposed chips. I figured I may as well since I am not gonna resell the part later on so sticking it on was a good choice. None of the adhesive went onto other components on the board and it looks pretty clean.

 

That being said the temps were pretty much the same as the 3 pipe 980M heatsink. On cool days the idle temp was 29 C but on hot days it can go up to at least 34-35 with fans at 100%. the load temps were also higher due to higher ambient temps so BF1 would hit about 68 C which is about 3-4 C higher than on a cool day. the temps haven't gone completely nuts post modification but have pretty much stayed the same as the 980M heatsink.

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@thegh0sts you wierdo, what crazy experiment are you up to now, hahaha. 

I just saw this thread now, or I would have joined in long ago. I could do cuts like this for you in the future if you need with my dremel (you sooo should buy one, such an awesome tool for this work!)

There is an alternative I can think of, for you instead of using heatsinks on the components directly with glue. You could have attached a cut out modified heatsink fin block to the heatsink there, and made it compatible. 

 

Like buy a few heatsinks from ebay for cheap, and cut the fins and attach a pipe etc..

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the thermal adhesive seems to be working well at holding down the heatsinks. the thermal tape just didn't have enough stickiness to stay on and a heatsink would get loose when i would reopen the laptop to see just how effective the adhesion was and, as said, it wasn't great. So I used Arctic Silver Alumina thermal adhesive to attach the heatsinks to the exposed chips. I figured I may as well since I am not gonna resell the part later on so sticking it on was a good choice. None of the adhesive went onto other components on the board and it looks pretty clean.

 

That being said the temps were pretty much the same as the 3 pipe 980M heatsink. On cool days the idle temp was 29 C but on hot days it can go up to at least 34-35 with fans at 100%. the load temps were also higher due to higher ambient temps so BF1 would hit about 68 C which is about 3-4 C higher than on a cool day. the temps haven't gone completely nuts post modification but have pretty much stayed the same as the 980M heatsink.


If you're still on the stock 120W power limit bios then yes the 980M heatsink will handle it fine. If you unlock it to what it can do - up to 200W - that's where the double heatsink will prove its worth

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Just an update I decided to by the chip programmer to see if I can flash a self-modded vbios with a higher TDP.

 

Things are gonna get interesting.

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Hi, I'm wondering if this mod is the only method of fitting a heatsink to a GtX 1070.  I'm not sure if they make one that is made to work with the 1070 in the p870dm-g.  I'm currently runing a 980m configuration of it, but was considering upgrading to a 1070 in the next few months.  As I would have to purchase a new heat sink regardless, I would prefer to buy one already made for the 1070 if it is available. If the mod is necessary ill do it, but i figured i might be able to save me a little bit of headache and time if a reseller has them prefab.

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Hi, I'm wondering if this mod is the only method of fitting a heatsink to a GtX 1070.  I'm not sure if they make one that is made to work with the 1070 in the p870dm-g.  I'm currently runing a 980m configuration of it, but was considering upgrading to a 1070 in the next few months.  As I would have to purchase a new heat sink regardless, I would prefer to buy one already made for the 1070 if it is available. If the mod is necessary ill do it, but i figured i might be able to save me a little bit of headache and time if a reseller has them prefab.



The primary GPU heatsink is fine. This mod is for those that want to use both fans to cool and do a bit of overclocking of the GPU.

Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk

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Thank you for your guide!

I followed the steps and sucessfully modified my heatsink mod.

:D

1.png.10bd1b973733976f5ee3d2dabfb3af8d.png2.png.d773123d8784c56eb0efe39bdacabd4f.png

Edited by Ultcrt
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On 7/7/2017 at 1:12 AM, thegh0sts said:

 


The primary GPU heatsink is fine. This mod is for those that want to use both fans to cool and do a bit of overclocking of the GPU.

Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
 

 

Does The 2nd GPU fan works by default with The msi 1070, or something needs to be done? 

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