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madbeast9

M11X Heatsink copper mod

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Hi all, I just wanted to share with you, this mod I made for the heat sink in the M11x R3, obviously it is the same procedure for the M11x R1, R2 and R3.
 

1) I used Artic Silver 5 in the CPU and GPU

 

2) Between the CPU, GPU and the heatsink plate there is a 100% copper plate in the middle with artic Sivler 5 on both sides.

 

3) On the heat sinks as you can see there are several plates of different sizes made of copper.

 

4) Ram cards have Copper heatsinks, didn't take pics of those, forgot it.

 

5) NOT GAMING MODE, I can use the laptop in regular mode (not playing games) Working on office, browsing the web, etc with no problem on any surface the temps drop to 40-50 Celcius, while playing games, with CPU and GPU overclocked they reach 80 Celcius, the palm rest feels hotter but it is because the volume inside the laptop increased, the density of materials, therefore now the copper with the heat sink is closer to the palm rest, but it doesn't mean it is hotter inside, it is just that the heat is getting transferred closer to your hands.

M11X mod3.jpg

M11X mod4.jpg

M11X mod2.jpg

M11X mod1.jpg

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Another neat non-hardware fix: Use msi afterburner in your current game to display per core cpu&gpu usage. Then once you got a feel for if the specific game is gpu or cpu bound, set a speed limit for the component that is not needed to run vs fast, to give more thermal headroom for the part that you'll run faster thanks to nvidia boost 2.0 / intel turbo boost.

I have a gt740m and a i7 4700mq, most of the time the cpu is not that stressed, while the gpu is at 99%-100% in a given game. In that case I use ThrottleStop to limit my cpu speed to a multiplier of 24 (so it runs at the top base clock of 2,4ghz instead of boosting up to 3,4 ghz) this gives me enough thermal capacity on the unified cooler with dual headpipe to overclock the gpu by 150mhz to the maxmum possible in msi. afterburner and keeping each part at under 80c, despite overclocking&a noticable boost in whatever game I'm on.

Gotta get myself some copper shivs tho and mod the heatsink.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

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On ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 4:48 AM, akeean said:

Another neat non-hardware fix: Use msi afterburner in your current game to display per core cpu&gpu usage. Then once you got a feel for if the specific game is gpu or cpu bound, set a speed limit for the component that is not needed to run vs fast, to give more thermal headroom for the part that you'll run faster thanks to nvidia boost 2.0 / intel turbo boost.

I have a gt740m and a i7 4700mq, most of the time the cpu is not that stressed, while the gpu is at 99%-100% in a given game. In that case I use ThrottleStop to limit my cpu speed to a multiplier of 24 (so it runs at the top base clock of 2,4ghz instead of boosting up to 3,4 ghz) this gives me enough thermal capacity on the unified cooler with dual headpipe to overclock the gpu by 150mhz to the maxmum possible in msi. afterburner and keeping each part at under 80c, despite overclocking&a noticable boost in whatever game I'm on.

Gotta get myself some copper shivs tho and mod the heatsink.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk
 

Awesome! have been thinking about it lately but never thought it could give actual good results, but 540M does not support Nvidia boost sadly I'm going to make it right now! thank you.

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how was the integration in the case, was it really tight or not?

I am planning to watercool the thing and was wondering if there was enough space to route tubing through the case

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I have make a heatsink mod also.And then put my laptop on a large cooling pad with 4x140MM fans and an external fan like vacum cleaner at the laptops ventilation .I put one more ''ram cooper heatsink'' on the first heatpipe but doesn't take a photo.I think that it is not possible to put more cooper coolers on this heatsink....

 

https://postimg.org/image/98qg87dch/

 

https://postimg.org/image/4l96tqb55/

 

https://postimg.org/image/d4x6588vd/

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Cool, awesome mod. I made a watercooled lowcost heatsink mod, the result was that the mod cooled down the cpu and gpu about 30-35% but i didnt had the time to optimize the system and play around with better cooling fluids and core-/fanvoltages cause in the longterm tests the temperature increased again. At the moment i use a standard fan and a cooling pad and temps are under 100% cpu-/gpu-core load around 70-78° C....

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jtothe could you share a picture of ur watercoller sistem, ty sound awsome

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Got someone extra Fans inside the M11x or have changed the stock fan with an quieter one?

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I might try adding some copper, since I'm gonna replace all the thermal paste and padds.

Would like to keep this laptop going for some extra time. (its still verry usefull on short trips)

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