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Falconet

eGPU with the GTX 1070/1080. Is it possible/worth it?

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Hello, 

I own a Lenovo Y510p with a GT755M SLI configuration (which almost always overheats/crashes for games that DO support them) and i plan to set up an eGPU for it.

I've done a considerable amount of research on the topic but there are still doubts to ascertain before moving on.

 

1) Is it possible for the latest series of GPUs (GTX 1070, GTX 1080) from Nvidia to be used as an eGPU? Those who've already tried it used stuff like the Razer Core or it's other branded equivalent. What I'm looking for is the complete DIY version using the EXP GDC V8 connected to the mPCIE underneath the laptop (the one which the wifi card uses). I am aware of the Thunderbolt tests on Macs but I'm curious about it's performance on the mPCIE. And would it be compatible with the mPCIE adapter? Would it be too "new" for my laptop bought in 2014? 

 

2) If it is possible, would it be worth it? Would the bottle-necking of the mPCIE be enough to diminish its worth? I wouldn't want to go for the GTX 970 or GTX 980 because my long term plan would be to use the GTX 1070 on a desktop set up once I settle down. (I'm a travelling student btw)

 

Thanks in advance.

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The EXP GDC product page has a good chart outlining what cards are ideal for PCIe x1 gen 2: http://www.banggood.com/EXP-GDC-Laptop-External-PCI-E-Graphics-Card-p-934367.html

 

I don't know if there's much truth to it, since I presume different applications might utilise the PCIe bus differently.

 

It should theoretically be possible to benchmark every card at PCIe x1 speeds to determine at what point additional graphics horsepower becomes meaningless due to PCIe x1 bottlenecks.

Edited by Arbystrider

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On 7/20/2016 at 2:22 AM, Falconet said:

Hello, 

I own a Lenovo Y510p with a GT755M SLI configuration (which almost always overheats/crashes for games that DO support them) and i plan to set up an eGPU for it.

I've done a considerable amount of research on the topic but there are still doubts to ascertain before moving on.

 

1) Is it possible for the latest series of GPUs (GTX 1070, GTX 1080) from Nvidia to be used as an eGPU? Those who've already tried it used stuff like the Razer Core or it's other branded equivalent. What I'm looking for is the complete DIY version using the EXP GDC V8 connected to the mPCIE underneath the laptop (the one which the wifi card uses). I am aware of the Thunderbolt tests on Macs but I'm curious about it's performance on the mPCIE. And would it be compatible with the mPCIE adapter? Would it be too "new" for my laptop bought in 2014? 

 

2) If it is possible, would it be worth it? Would the bottle-necking of the mPCIE be enough to diminish its worth? I wouldn't want to go for the GTX 970 or GTX 980 because my long term plan would be to use the GTX 1070 on a desktop set up once I settle down. (I'm a travelling student btw)

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Did you end up moving forward?  How did it work out?

 

i have the same laptop so i am curious. 

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